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Old 06-20-2011, 07:46 AM   #1
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Default Increase Growth Hormone and Testosterone

Hey MAB

I thought I would make a thread about increasing growth hormone and testosterone through exercise and according to this PT book I'm studying, which sorts of exercises do it best.

We all know doing weight training increases both, but according to the personal training text book on hormones, they break down which %RM is best for promoting the increase of each hormone.

This is adapted from the book

Growth Hormone (GH)
It has been shown that as an increase in the concentration of hydrogen ions in the blood can cause an increase in the release of GH. The concentration of hydrogen ions in the blood is increase through anaerobic glycolysis (lactic acid energy system). The conclusion can be drawn that to increase GH levels, it is important to do a program that increases lactate levels, so something high intensity with a short rest interval. In terms of weight training, this means 3-4 sets of your 10RM with a 60 second rest interval. The short rest interval is a common denominator in increasing GH levels.

Note on energy systems:
The main energy system used for weight lifting is the ATP-CP system, which is basically the resysenthesis of ATP from ADP through the breakdown of creatine phosphate. This system is very very fast and powerful and has no by products. But it doesnt last long at all.

The next one used is anaerobic glycolysis aka the lactic acid energy system. This one is the resysenthesis of ATP from ADP through the breakdown of glycogen without oxygen. This as a result creates lactate (not a bad thing, lactate tends to be fairly misunderstood), as well as hydrogen ions, which decreases the pH of the body. This is responsible for the pain from training and some of the fatigue, and from what I mentioned above, it also increases your GH levels.

Testosterone (Test)
Test levels have been shown to increase through doing large compound movements at 85%RM+ for a relatively high volume of 3-10 sets with short rest intervals of up to 60 seconds. In addition if you have a long training history, this sort of exercise creates an even bigger boost in test levels. The book doesnt go into any more detail sets and reps, but I would assume its 3-10 of maybe single or doubles, or maybe even triples? Any thoughts?

What is also interesting is that there is a significant increase in IGF-1 (Insulin like Growth Hormone) and test levels in older trained males from the participation in periodized heavy resistance training.

This information was taken and adapted from the PT book Im studying to become a PT, which will be very soon.

I think the conclusion we can draw is if the weights are heavy and the exercise hurts, its going to be good for you.

What does everyone think?

P.S. I didnt go into details of why its good to have more test and GH and I didnt go into a lot of detail on the energy systems. Also sorry for any typos, its late at night for me lol
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Old 06-20-2011, 07:49 AM   #2
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Interesting stuff Spart.
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Old 06-20-2011, 08:03 AM   #3
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From what I understand of the hormonal responses to training stimuli, the raises in levels are negligible. Many things such as exercise choice, form, weight used, nutrition will make a far bigger difference and will be easier to measure and affect. This is why I don't concern myself with the minutiae of training. I just pick things up and put them down.

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Old 06-20-2011, 08:09 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by LtL View Post
From what I understand of the hormonal responses to training stimuli, the raises in levels are negligible. Many things such as exercise choice, form, weight used, nutrition will make a far bigger difference and will be easier to measure and affect. This is why I don't concern myself with the minutiae of training. I just pick things up and put them down.

LtL
Yeah I know what you mean. The book doesnt specify any values or anything like that, which can be a problem in determining how valuable said info is.
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Old 06-20-2011, 08:15 AM   #5
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I think the conclusion we can draw is if the weights are heavy and the exercise hurts, its going to be good for you.
I like this bit

I found this thats interesting too along the same line...

Quote:
STUDY SUGGESTS THREE SETS ARE BETTER THAN ONE
TO PRODUCE MAXIMUM TESTOSTERONE IN MALE WEIGHT LIFTERS

Tom McCullough
Strength and Conditioning/
Sport Nutrition Consultant

Subject: Training to Increase Testosterone. How many sets: Is one enough?
Study Results

As most of us are probably aware, anabolic hormonal responses from weight
training are very important to muscle growth. Some of these anabolic
hormones responsible for growth are growth hormone (GH) and testosterone.
What many of us may not be aware of is what amount of volume is necessary to
stimulate the highest amount of anabolic hormone production. This study may
help to solve the never ending debate between HIT and more conventional
protocols.

In a recent study done by Gotshalk (1996), serum GH, testosterone, cortisol,
and whole blood lactate responses to single-set vs. multiple set heavy
resistance exercise protocols were examined. Eight weight trained men
completed a resistance exercise workout of 10 RM with a 1 set design and
also completed an identical workout with a 3 set design. Both workouts
utilized 1 minute rest periods. The exercises used were the leg press, bench
press, wide grip pull down, shoulder press, seated row, arm curl, leg
extension, and sit up. Blood was then drawn pre-exercise, immediately
post-exercise and at 5 min, 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min.

Results:

GH was highest in both workouts at 15 min. post-exercise. However, the 3 set
protocol was significantly higher (16.16 g/L) than the 1 set protocol (7.47
g/L).

Testosterone production was highest in both protocols immediately
post-exercise. Again, the 3 set protocol induced a significantly higher
response (29.60 mmol/L) than the single-set protocol (24.92 mmol/L). The 3
set protocol also kept production much higher at the end of 60 min (24.84
mmol/L vs. 22.30 mmol/L).

Whole blood lactate production, as suspected was significantly higher with
the 3 set protocol ( 9.42 mmol/L) than the 1 set protocol ( 6.47 mmol/L)
immediately post-exercise.

Cortisol production was the highest in both workouts at 15 min.
post-exercise. Because the 3 set protocol probably caused more stress the
cortisol production was significantly higher (485.25 nmol/L) than the 1 set
protocol (428.75 nmol/L).

The testosterone to cortisol production ratio shows the ratio between protein
degradation and protein synthesis. As we all are aware, the higher the
synthesis to degradation ratio the better. The highest ratio in both
protocols was found at 5 min. post-exercise. The 3 set protocol induced a
much higher ratio ( 0.0680 ) than the 1 set protocol (0.0599). Meaning
protein synthesis was much higher than protein degradation in the 3 set
protocol when compared to the 1 set protocol. This is though to be optimal
for stimulating muscle growth.

Thus, it is concluded that higher volumes of work produce significantly
greater increases in circulating anabolic hormones during recovery. Using
larger training volumes is the preferred method to induce maximal muscle
hypertrophy.


Gotshalk, L.A., et.al. (1996). Pituitary-gonadal hormonal responses of
multi-set vs. single -set resistance exercise. Journal of Strength and
Conditioning Research. 10(4):286. Abstract.
interesting ??

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Old 06-20-2011, 08:18 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Spartigus View Post

Testosterone (Test)
Test levels have been shown to increase through doing large compound movements at 85%RM+ for a relatively high volume of 3-10 sets with short rest intervals of up to 60 seconds. In addition if you have a long training history, this sort of exercise creates an even bigger boost in test levels. The book doesnt go into any more detail sets and reps, but I would assume its 3-10 of maybe single or doubles, or maybe even triples? Any thoughts?
Dmaipa recently wrote an article that referenced something similar. I have not read the study so I will not comment on it specifically.

One thing I will say is that studies often neglect several important factors. These factors vary from study to study, but are important. In this study, for example, the following factors are ignored:

1) 85% for a newbie does not impact the body and its systems in the same way 85% for and experienced intermediate to advanced lifter.

2) Experience level of the lifter. The body responds on a more heightened level for beginners. We all know when training properly, they gain rapidly.

3) Hard work. Numbers can often paint the illusion that someone is working hard. Two different lifters can perform very similar workouts, and one lifter will walk away destroyed while the other lifter may have been pulling back by a rep or two on each set.

Lastly, the body can only hold so much muscle naturally. Natural testosterone levels are one of the limiting factors in this reality. Even if you are able to spike test levels by a little bit each workout using this training, this slight increase would not change how big you get in the long run.

With that said, it may be a good style for short term gains, but as we have discussed with the gains curve, everything evens out as long as progression and persistence are in the mix.

I would never dissuade anyone from using the above format. I've used it myself in some form or fashion. But as a study it's incomplete. I know the article as a whole isn't a study, but they did reference "is shown" which means they are basing it on a study or two.
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Old 06-20-2011, 08:24 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by BendtheBar View Post
Dmaipa recently wrote an article that referenced something similar. I have not read the study so I will not comment on it specifically.

One thing I will say is that studies often neglect several important factors. These factors vary from study to study, but are important. In this study, for example, the following factors are ignored:

1) 85% for a newbie does not impact the body and its systems in the same way 85% for and experienced intermediate to advanced lifter.

2) Experience level of the lifter. The body responds on a more heightened level for beginners. We all know when training properly, they gain rapidly.

3) Hard work. Numbers can often paint the illusion that someone is working hard. Two different lifters can perform very similar workouts, and one lifter will walk away destroyed while the other lifter may have been pulling back by a rep or two on each set.

Lastly, the body can only hold so much muscle naturally. Natural testosterone levels are one of the limiting factors in this reality. Even if you are able to spike test levels by a little bit each workout using this training, this slight increase would change how big you get in the long run.

With that said, it may be a good style for short term gains, but as we have discussed with the gains curve, everything evens out as long as progression and persistence are in the mix.

I would never dissuade anyone from using the above format. I've used it myself in some form or fashion. But as a study it's incomplete. I know the article as a whole isn't a study, but they did reference "is shown" which means they are basing it on a study or two.
Thats interesting Steve, was hoping for a response like that. This is one of the first times I have actually looked at these hormones past an outline of what they do.

The book is probably focused towards your average Joe Shmo who just picked up a barbell. This is seen through looking at how they manage routines in the text book. I guess this is why quite a few trainers at gyms tend generate a lot of misconceptions in the gym?
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Old 06-20-2011, 08:34 AM   #8
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Thats interesting Steve, was hoping for a response like that. This is one of the first times I have actually looked at these hormones past an outline of what they do.

The book is probably focused towards your average Joe Shmo who just picked up a barbell. This is seen through looking at how they manage routines in the text book. I guess this is why quite a few trainers at gyms tend generate a lot of misconceptions in the gym?
You would be surprised how many 'trainers' there are who dont squat 'cos its bad for your knees', who tell you to do high reps 'to burn fat' and tell you that 'anything less than 50% carbs is dangerous' !!!

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Old 06-20-2011, 08:41 AM   #9
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You would be surprised how many 'trainers' there are who dont squat 'cos its bad for your knees', who tell you to do high reps 'to burn fat' and tell you that 'anything less than 50% carbs is dangerous' !!!

Carl.
Hahah yeah, I will be working with a few of them. A couple of the young guys (18-20) all have like 4+ years of resistance training and like 4+ years of power and strength training. But none of the squat deep enough, or can even do lifts properly, also they are all about 5"11ish and weigh like 175lbs soaking wet.
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