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Old 12-02-2010, 02:58 PM   #101
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That last program looks insane! He probably ate like a
frickin beast to recover!
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Old 12-02-2010, 08:00 PM   #102
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Originally Posted by dmaipa View Post
That last program looks insane! He probably ate like a
frickin beast to recover!
A big part of staying on a fullbody program is your adaption. By gradually working into larger workloads over time your body has adapted to handle it quite well. Reeves also had great genetics, and had built up a serious ability to handle large workloads.

While some guys did eat BIG, it was not always the case for everyone. I don't have my Reeves book to refer too right now, but If I remember right he was not a power eater type.

Marvin Eader was not a power eater. He preferred to eat fairly normal. He again was also someone of superior genetics for the sport.

I think there is something to be said for developing the CNS to handle the workloads imposed by this type of training.

I've got a few more ideas, opinions on this but I need to get my thoughts together.
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Old 12-04-2010, 11:46 AM   #103
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Default Self assesment, and working the program

Have you ever blown up one of those ballons that was not just a round ballon or a tube ballon? You know the kind, it has a head and arms and various other areas off the main body. What did you have to do to get it blown up properly? You had to hold back certain parts to allow other areas to catch up, but in the end the whole thing was balanced and full.


Well that is one way you can you can work within this progam as well. You can hold back on certain moves to allow other moves the energy to be worked harder. This really no different than what people do in split programs, but we are doing it within a wholebody concept.

So here is our Reeves program. We'll use this as an example.

Reeves classic physique

squat..........3x8-12
bb row........3x8-12....DL 3x5* see note
bhp............3x8-12
bench.........3x8-12
BB/DB curl...3x8-12
dips............5x10@BW Try for sets of 10, but do what you can.
BB calf raise 3x15-20
abs
Perform M-W-F

**On Friday drop BB row and do 3x5 deadlifts** Deadlifts are to be done Reg park style. 2 warmup/ 1 heavy work set.



For most people just starting this program the last half is going to present some new challenges. They are not used to fullbody in the first place, and they are not used to working delts in front of chest. The balance seems off to them. Then they have to do dips after that as well.

The common mindset will be to really push chest work, and make getting your bench numbers back a priority. This is exactly what you don't want to do.


What you can do is allow your bench numbers to stall, or hold them back to a slower weight increase once you are ready to move up the weight. Make your pressing work your top priority as the number to move up, while inhibiting other aspects.


As an example. lets say your doing these numbers, this week.

bhp............3x12@75
bench.........3x12@115
BB/DB curl...3x12@55
dips............5x10@BW reps done 5/ 4 / 3 /2 /1

So based on the numbers above we are ready to go up in weight since we did all sets at 12 reps.

However our pressing numbers and dip numbers are fairly weak. What you could do is this. Notice the bench numbers.

bhp............3x8@ 80//emphasis given
bench.........3x8@115//no increase
BB/DB curl...3x8@55// no increase
dips............5x10@BW// emphasis given


You won't see the differance for a few sessions, but the energy your not expending on pushing your bench will allow for your pressing and dipping to improve.

Work up in reps as you normally would even for the moves were the weight did not increase. Don't continue to push out 12 rep sets for them. Save that energy for the other moves. It will not take that long to even things out, and you will be surpised at just how strong your bench really is once you start to move it up.


Several months into this program your going to run into a wall where you feel like you have stalled, and it is no longer working. This is completely normal, and is just another aspect to be worked. We'll talk about that later.
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:30 PM   #104
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Originally Posted by glwanabe View Post
Have you ever blown up one of those ballons that was not just a round ballon or a tube ballon? You know the kind, it has a head and arms and various other areas off the main body. What did you have to do to get it blown up properly? You had to hold back certain parts to allow other areas to catch up, but in the end the whole thing was balanced and full.


Well that is one way you can you can work within this progam as well. You can hold back on certain moves to allow other moves the energy to be worked harder. This really no different than what people do in split programs, but we are doing it within a wholebody concept.

So here is our Reeves program. We'll use this as an example.

Reeves classic physique

squat..........3x8-12
bb row........3x8-12....DL 3x5* see note
bhp............3x8-12
bench.........3x8-12
BB/DB curl...3x8-12
dips............5x10@BW Try for sets of 10, but do what you can.
BB calf raise 3x15-20
abs
Perform M-W-F

**On Friday drop BB row and do 3x5 deadlifts** Deadlifts are to be done Reg park style. 2 warmup/ 1 heavy work set.



For most people just starting this program the last half is going to present some new challenges. They are not used to fullbody in the first place, and they are not used to working delts in front of chest. The balance seems off to them. Then they have to do dips after that as well.

The common mindset will be to really push chest work, and make getting your bench numbers back a priority. This is exactly what you don't want to do.


What you can do is allow your bench numbers to stall, or hold them back to a slower weight increase once you are ready to move up the weight. Make your pressing work your top priority as the number to move up, while inhibiting other aspects.


As an example. lets say your doing these numbers, this week.

bhp............3x12@75
bench.........3x12@115
BB/DB curl...3x12@55
dips............5x10@BW reps done 5/ 4 / 3 /2 /1

So based on the numbers above we are ready to go up in weight since we did all sets at 12 reps.

However our pressing numbers and dip numbers are fairly weak. What you could do is this. Notice the bench numbers.

bhp............3x8@ 80//emphasis given
bench.........3x8@115//no increase
BB/DB curl...3x8@55// no increase
dips............5x10@BW// emphasis given


You won't see the differance for a few sessions, but the energy your not expending on pushing your bench will allow for your pressing and dipping to improve.

Work up in reps as you normally would even for the moves were the weight did not increase. Don't continue to push out 12 rep sets for them. Save that energy for the other moves. It will not take that long to even things out, and you will be surpised at just how strong your bench really is once you start to move it up.


Several months into this program your going to run into a wall where you feel like you have stalled, and it is no longer working. This is completely normal, and is just another aspect to be worked. We'll talk about that later.
great post gl thanks
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Old 12-05-2010, 07:16 AM   #105
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Default An interesting read from the year 1951.

BTB has this as a thread in the classic bodybuilder section. I just copied it from there.

Clarence Ross was called the King of bodybuilders in his prime.





Routines I Have Used
by Clarence Ross (1951)


I have the type of mind which some would call methodical. I like to think things out and to plan each move, and I have always kept a careful record of my training programs as well as notes concerning what they have and have not done for me. In addition, my active work as an instructor has kept constantly aware of the various stages the lifter goes through, for in my gym I have members who are in all degrees of development, from rank beginners to real stars. Therefore, I have never lost touch with my past, even while thinking of the future. The exercise and developmental changes I went through are being reenacted before me by my pupils daily. I note that in each there is a similarity to the changes I went through, from beginner to advanced champion. In speaking to the various other advanced men I have found that they too went through stages which resembled my own, once I refreshed their memories with certain questions.

Therefore, for the first time, I believe it is possible for an author to present to his readers certain facts connected with the development of championship form which most of the stars went through, as brought out in the routines I followed myself. With this information at hand, the interested bodybuilder can pick up at the point in his own training which is approximately the same that my own was at a certain stage of my lifting career, and then, if he follow the PRINCIPLES and utilizes some of the workout IDEAS set down for that time he should be positive of making gains. In this way he will be able to eliminate programs which are too advanced for his level, and also be able to skip over those which are too elementary to do him much good.

It must be remembered that since I began my active career in 1940, there have been definite advances made in bodybuilding. Therefore, while I will give some of my actual programs, there will also be some comments added concerning these, based on my present experience with more modern methods. In this way, while the report of my training programs will be accurate, this report will also be brought up to current standards by my comments.


In 1948, weighing just 135 pounds, I began my training. At that time, sets were not very well known, at least not as we know them today, and the accepted training was the single set system in which a dozen of so basic exercises were followed, each 10 reps, never performing more than one set of any exercise, and never returning back to any exercise once you had completed a set of it.

At the very start, having practically no knowledge of weight training, I though like so many do, even to this day, that the exercise session consisted mainly of lifting weights above the head while in a standing position. For several months I did nothing but standing presses! I just lifted a weight to my shoulders, pushed it overhead, lowered it to shoulders, pressed it again and so on. Press, press and press . . . that was all! I got a little stronger in this particular exercise as a result, but didn’t have much muscle to show for my efforts after two months.

It was then that a training partner mapped out a more complete course for me, which was . . . one set, 10 reps each of the following: squats, shrugs, standing press, bentover rowing, bent arm lying laterals, barbell curl, upright rowing, repetition cleans to the shoulder, press behind neck, pullover, lying floor press and deadlift.

I trained three times a week and spent about 1½ years on this routine, or a very similar one, changing one exercise or so once in a while. In addition, I performed all exercises very stiffly and in rigid form which was the generally advised procedure at that time. I gained 30 pounds in that year and a half. Then I grew discouraged with my training for I had reached a sticking point, and gave up exercise for two years.

In looking back at this first routine I feel that for the beginner, with certain corrections such as grouping the exercises a bit differently, it was basically a good one. In fact it is quite similar to the ones given to the beginner in many systems of lifting. However, it was too limited. At first I made some nice gains, but then with no way to progress other than to add more weight to the various exercises I grew bored with the routine. It failed to continue to stimulate me and since there seemed to be no change possible to help me, I just gave up. Had I known about sets at that time, I would probably never have taken that long layoff. So by sticking to a beginner’s routine for too long I wasted about three years which could have been used to good advantage. This is one lesson every lifter can learn well – a routine must be changed from time to time to make it more progressive and interesting to avoid the sticking point in training and to keep enthusiasm going strong.

In 1942 I went into the service, weighing 155 pounds, having lost 10 pounds after giving up training. It was while in the service that I met my now good friend Leo Stern and recaptured my interest in the weights. The regular set system was still not well known at that time, but Leo mapped out a program which I will refer to as a split-set program. In it, there were 30 or 35 exercises and while more than one set of each exercise was not usually done one right after the other, a number of the exercises appeared more than once in the routine. This sample program will illustrate this: upright row, incline press, lateral raise, alternate curl and press with dumbells, pullover and floor press, rowing motion, dumbell curl, dip, upright row, incline press, lateral raise, dumbell curl, rowing motion, pullover and press, alternate curl and press with dumbells, dips, upright row, incline press, lateral raise, barbell curl, pullover and press, rowing motion, dip, situp, side bend, and then three sets of squats and two sets of leg raises.

As can be seen from the above routine, most of the exercises appeared more than once at various points in the program, but only in the squats and leg presses was a true set system practiced. The others were split up.

This method of training was popular at that time and was the forerunner of the regular set system as we know it today. It also combined a certain amount of flushing muscle principle as well as even a bit of the super set method. In addition, I relaxed my training style to some extent and included a form of moderate cheating in the movements.

I realized big gains in bulk, endurance and power from this program. Looking back that the program now I feel that better results would have been made if I had advanced right into a real set series as we now practice it. This split-set type of routine does not give the complete flushness of a regular set series, but it was such an improvement over anything I had done in the past that I made great gains. I continued to train three times a week as before . . . more frequent training was considered by most authorities at that time as being harmful, though rumors were beginning to get around about some of the stars who did more and who reported good results.

Now I went into the next advancement in my program. I noticed that my legs needed more work so I decided to specialize on them. While I did not train more than three days a week, in studying my own reactions to heavy leg work, I came to the conclusion that it would be necessary for me to split up my training and devote an exercise session entirely to them, with separate sessions for my upper body. I just didn’t have the energy to do it all in one workout. So on my three weekly workout days I performed all my upper-body work in the morning, and then this same day in the afternoon I did my squats and leg presses as well as calf raises. Basically, the exercises remained the same as listed above, with the exception that I did my leg work during a separate session devoted entirely to them. This plan is of course impractical for those who do not have the free time I was fortunate enough to have then, and based on my present experience I will say that it will work nearly as well for them if they do their leg work first in the training session when their energy is highest, and then follow this with their other exercises. This is a plan I follow to this day, for except before a contest I still train only three times a week, though my workouts are longer and harder than ever before.

At this time I once again hit a sort of sticking point in my training. I had made such great advances that there was now no question in my mind about continuing my training, but I knew that I needed a change. I felt as though I needed more power . . . that my strength had to be drastically increased so that I could extend myself more in future training. I reduced my repetitions in the exercises, used heavier weights and cut down the number of exercises in my program. I also included some weightlifting movements, such as heavy standing presses and repetition snatches and clean & jerks. The lifting movements were first on the program, and several sets were done of each. The balance of the routine had squats, shrugs, deadlifts, curls, pullover, bench press and so on. Not too many exercises and still not performed in regular set series style, though the same exercises did appear several times in the workout.

On this program I did indeed gain a lot of power and looked better. My enthusiasm was at a real high. Once again, the change did me good, and another training approach – Power Training – had given me another step forward.

It was then that a number of us on the coast, who were training together with similar methods, began to think about the 1945 Mr. America title. We planned for this well in advance . . . in fact, six months in ahead. The first three months I spent on a semi-specialized program. I trained the entire body, but paid special attention to one part, such as the arms, for several weeks, concentrating on these mainly, and filling in with other all around exercises. I still practiced the split-set program, with most of the exercises being performed several times at different points in the program. Every few weeks I specialized on another part until I hit all major body groups with specialized movements. I also used some cables and other pieces of apparatus during this time which added to my muscularity and general improvement.

I then made a change and went on a bulk course. I needed more weight. The way we trained for bulk in those days was to sort of “fatten” up. This was done by following a limited program, one set each of the following: standing press, barbell curl, upright row, bench press, incline bench press, deadlift, squat, leg press and calf raise. Each exercise was done for 10 reps and only for one set. In addition I drank a lot of milk, took life easy and gained weight.

It was then when personal temperament and physical type manifested itself to me. To this day I still find that a routine similar to the one above gives me more bulk, though today at my more advanced level I perform three sets of each exercise. However, I know that other advanced men find that lower reps suit them better, so all that we can learn from the above is that a curtailed routine, one in which less than the normal amount of exercises are performed is good for bulk. THE REPS AND SETS WILL DEPEND A LOT UPON THE INDIVIDUAL. It is important that you realize this.

Then, after the above routine for a month, I went into a definition program. In doing this I followed the same exercises, but increased the repetitions to 15 or 20 and shortened my rest breaks between exercises. Here too, such a plan has since always suited me best. But certain other lifters have found a different plan as being best for them when seeking definition, such as performing a greater number of exercises, or even using very heavy weights in their limit lifts. So the lesson to be learned from this is that FOR MORE DEFINITION YOU MUST WORK HARDER . . . either more reps, more exercises or heavier lifts . . . limit lifts. Exactly how you apply this principle depends upon YOUR REACTION FROM PERSONAL TESTS, but the theory will always work when used.

The last month before the contest I trained every day, pumping up every muscle in my body to the limit. I split up the program, performing all upper body training one day and lower body the next. A large variety of movements were followed, and my exact routine would serve no purpose other than to bring out that fact. I used weighted boots, headstrap, wrist roller, kettlebells and every exercise and apparatus known! This was the most advanced short-term pre-contest training known at that time, though today certain stars train three times a day before a contest, devoting a training session to one major part.

After the Mr. America contest, which I am proud to have won, I went into a regular set series program for the first time, performing this routine three times a week, 3 sets, 10 reps each exercise: squat, calf raise, bench press, bentover rowing, upright rowing, barbell curl, reverse curl, triceps curl and situp.

Since that time I have followed many routines and to set them all down would be meaningless. At times I specialized mainly on one part of the body, at other times trained for bulk, sometimes for power and often for definition. Any single routine I followed would not necessarily be of benefit to any other person, for each was devised expressly for myself and the results I wanted at the time. Except before a contest, I still train three times a week. Before a contest I train more often, sometimes several times a day, six days a week. I always perform sets of exercises and do not follow a strict exercise style, cheating in most of the movements. Without the set system and the cheating exercises I am certain I never would have developed as fully as I have.

So in analyzing the various routines I have followed, this pattern is formed . . . first a beginner’s routine until progress reaches a pause, then a more advanced routine which in my case was a split-set program, but which experience has taught me would have been better had it been a regular set series program as we know it today. Then, when there is a slow up in progress again, work for POWER to get a new drive. Then specialize for bulk, definition or improvement of any lagging part. Plan your peak well in advance, working up to a peak in training intensity shortly by working out more than three times a week, even several short and intense sessions per day. Finally – BE RECEPTIVE!
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:01 AM   #106
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Originally Posted by glwanabe View Post

So in analyzing the various routines I have followed, this pattern is formed . . . first a beginner’s routine until progress reaches a pause, then a more advanced routine which in my case was a split-set program, but which experience has taught me would have been better had it been a regular set series program as we know it today. Then, when there is a slow up in progress again, work for POWER to get a new drive. Then specialize for bulk, definition or improvement of any lagging part. Plan your peak well in advance, working up to a peak in training intensity shortly by working out more than three times a week, even several short and intense sessions per day. Finally – BE RECEPTIVE!
This last paragraph is worth the price of the article. Essentially, if we fail to plan, we fail. There is a process to hypertrophy, just because you lift a bar wont make you big, there is a process, a strategy. We each need to sit down and exam our goals and then develop a clear plan of attack. Then, don't sit on it and think about it for weeks on end, execute the plan.

For those participating in this challenge, phase one is to pick your routine. Don't pick it based upon how cool it looks, examine your personal goals and abilities and choose the plan that will best help you reach your goal. Phase two, execute. Get into the gym and put the plan to work. Leave the ego at the door, don't worry about what you can't do, focus on what you can, failure is not an option. Phase 3, realize the gym is only part of the battle. Work on getting the rest of life in order. Remove distractions, clean up the diet, do some life planning while you are at it.

It is clear that Ross learned to think through where he was going and how he was going to get there. We need to do the same.

ok, off soap box. Have a great day!
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:02 AM   #107
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Default Reg Park

How I Trained to Win Mr. Universe
by Reg Park
from Health and Strength (1967)

My interest in development was kindled by my grandfather who worked in a coal mine from the age of ten to sixty-five, during which time he had pushed trucks full of coal along tunnels, and in doing so had developed a pair of enormous calves. His calves were so big that I remember my grandmother telling me that when he was in uniform during the 1914-1918 war, when soldiers wore puttees, his calves were so big that people thought he had balloons under his trouser legs. My grandparents had two paintings of an ancient Greek wedding where the man wore a toga and I recall thinking that whilst the groom had wonderful legs, his upper arms were poorly developed.

These memories go back to the time when I was about eight years old, so it is apparent that I was physique conscious at a very early age. At school I reveled in sport, in particular soccer, athletics and gymnastics, but although I possessed an athletic physique, at 16 I was 6 ft. and weighed only 160 lbs., certainly nothing to set the world alight. At the Leeds open-air swimming pool I was constantly aware of fellows who possessed good physiques, and I suppose it was inevitable that sooner or later I would meet someone who for those days possessed an outstanding physique in the person of Dave Cohen. Dave was 5 ft. 8½” ins. and weighed 185 lbs. with 16½ in. upper arms, a 47 in. chest, 26 in. thighs and a 32 in. waist. It turned out that Dave trained with weights in a room in his friend’s house, and when I asked if I could join him, he readily said yes.

I started weight training in about August/September 1945, and trained in a haphazard kind of way until April 1946, and from then until July 1946 when I was ‘called up’, I spent my free time at the pool and did very little training. At my army medical in 1946 I was 6 ft. and weighed 180 lbs. In the army I was in the P.T. staff in Malaya, and whilst I had plenty of exercise, only once or twice did I have access to weights.

I was demobbed in July 1948 and weighed 190 lbs. This was about a month before the 1948 Olympics held that year in London, and also the first ever Mr. Universe contest held in London. Naturally, by this time I was an avid reader of the muscle magazines and was therefore familiar with the top bodybuilders who were participating in the contest, namely John Grimek and Steve Reeves. It’s history now that Grimek won the 1948 Mr. Universe with Reeves runner-up.

I recall saying after the contest that one day I’d win the Mr. Universe title, and amongst those present were Oscar Heidenstam and John Barrs, editor of the old Vigor magazine. I’ve often wondered what their thoughts must have been as they listened to a young punk like me boasting that I’d win the Mr. U.

My training started in earnest about September 1948, when I was 20 years of age and weighed 190 lbs. In those days I trained three nights a week and Sunday morning, and if my memory serves me well, my course was something like this:

Incline D.B Press – 5 sets of 5 reps
Flat Bench D.B. Press – 5x5
Pushups with Press – 5 x 10
Standing Barbell Press – 5x5
Press Behind Neck – 5x5
Standing Two D.B Press – 5x5
Chins – 5x8
Barbell Row – 5x8
D.B. Row – 5x8
Barbell Curl – 5x8
Incline D.B. Curl – 5x8
Central Loading Curl – 5x8
Standing D.B. Triceps Curl – 5x8
Lying D.B. Triceps Curl – 5x8
Triceps on Lat Machine – 5x8
Donkey Calf – 5 sets
Cross Bench D.B. Pullover – 5x8

I don’t recall doing any squats in those days, but when I look back I realize that I was doing about 90 sets a workout which I’m sure was far more than any British bodybuilder was doing in 48/49. By March/April 1949 I entered and won the Mr. N.E. Britain, beating the previous national winner, Charlie Jarrett, who was also placed in the 48 Mr. Universe. Not bad for only 7 or 8 months of serious training. At this time I weighed 205 lbs. and my measurements were 48 in. chest and 16½ in. upper arm.

Three weeks before the 1949 Mr. Britain final I trained at Henry Atkins’ gym in Walthamstow, London, during which time I worked calves and thighs (3 sets of 20 reps) superset with pullovers on the Yoga bench, three mornings a week, and trained upper body in the evenings. I ate and drank great quantities of food and liquid, and my bodyweight by the time of the contest was 226 lbs. I drank two pints of diluted concentrated orange juice with glucose and honey mixed in it at every workout.

I won the 1949 Mr. Britain title with Paul Newington second and John Lees third. At that time my chest was about 51 in., arm 18 in. and thigh 26½. In December 1949 my parents gave me the greatest gift I could have had, a six month visit to America. In America I met and trained with many champion bodybuilders, such as Bill Barad, Marvin Eder, Abe Goldberg, Clancy Ross, Floyd Page, Norman Marks, Malcolm Brenner, etc. I also trained at the Weider Barbell Co. and am the first to admit that Weider, Barton Horvath and Charlie Smith all helped me considerably with my training, but Weider made far too many claims about training me, so many that I eventually wrote to him severing all connections with him. This was in April 1952.

I came back to England in May 1952 and decided to enter the Mr. U. which was held early that year in either June or July. In the meantime, York Barbell Co. had persuaded Steve Reeves to represent them at the same Mr. U. and he had gone to York to finalize his training there.

On the day of the contest I weighed in at 215 lbs. and Reeves at 225. Reeves was bigger than I was, but I was terribly muscular, with my legs, torso and arms cut up with definition. Reeves won the contest, but he was a very worried man prior to the announcement, and I recall the then editor of Health and Strength, Johnson, striving to convince him backstage that he had won. When I reflected that with less than two years’ serious training I had given the very famous Steve Reeves, who had been training at least five years, such a good run for his money, I did not feel too bad, but then and there I was determined that no one would beat me in the 1951 Mr. Universe.

In September 1950 I went back to the States, where I trained hard at Abe Goldberg’s gym in New York for the 1950 America’s Best Developed Man contest, held at St. Nick’s Arena in New York. I won this title and with it most of the subdivisions, and in doing so beat such famous bodybuilders as Floyd Page, Al Stephan, Ed Theriault and Al Pavio, who was the current Mr. Canada. From New York I went of to give exhibitions in Montreal, Toronto, Oakland, Los Angeles and Hawaii, returning to England in January 1951.

From January until the Mr. Universe contest I trained regularly, hard and heavy. Regular poundages used in training were sets and reps with over 200 lbs. on the Press and Press Behind Neck, Incline and Flat D.B. Press sets and reps with 2x140 lb. dumbells, Bent Rowing with 250-300 lbs., Incline D.B. Curls with 2x70 lb. dumbells, and 3 sets of 20 reps on the Squat with 320 lbs. My workouts in those days were:

Incline D.B. Press – 5x5 with 140 lb. dumbells
Flat Bench D.B. Press – 5x5 with 140 lb. dumbells
Pushups
Press Behind Neck – 5x5 with 210 lbs.
Press – 5x5 with 210 lbs.
Two D.B. Press – 5x5 working up to 100 lb. dumbells
Dumbell Lateral – 5x8 with 50-60 lb. dumbells
Chins – 5x8
Bent Barbell Row – 5x8 with 250-300 lbs.
One Arm D.B. Row – 5x8 with 100-120 lb. dumbell
Lat Pulldown – 5x8
Central Loading Curl – 5x8 with 140 lbs.
Incline D.B. Curl – 5x8 with 70 lb. dumbells
Barbell Curl – 5x8
Lying On Back Two Dumbell Curl – 5x8 with 50-60 lb. dumbells
One D.B. Two Arm French Press – 5x8
Lying B.B. Triceps Extension – 5x8
Triceps Dips or Parallel Bar Dips – 5x8
Triceps On Lat Machine – 5x8
Donkey Calf On Machine – 10x20
Squat – 3x20 with 320 lbs.
D.B. Pullover – 3x10

My weight went back to 225 lbs. but I possessed a much different physique compared to when I won the Mr. Britain at 226. Now I was proportionate, balanced and more heavily developed.

My eating habits were not difficult. My mother cooked and baked well, and I ate anything and everything, and I was particularly fond of my mother’s baking and cups of tea, relying on hard training to use up the carbohydrates. As you know, I won the ’51 Mr. Universe after only three years of serious training.

As with each of the other two occasions when I won the title I was a little flat emotion wise after being announced the winner, and I REALIZED THAT THE EXCITEMENT WAS NOT IN WINNING BUT IN TRAINING TO WIN.
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:22 AM   #108
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This last paragraph is worth the price of the article. Essentially, if we fail to plan, we fail. There is a process to hypertrophy, just because you lift a bar wont make you big, there is a process, a strategy. We each need to sit down and exam our goals and then develop a clear plan of attack. Then, don't sit on it and think about it for weeks on end, execute the plan.

For those participating in this challenge:

phase one is to pick your routine. Don't pick it based upon how cool it looks, examine your personal goals and abilities and choose the plan that will best help you reach your goal.


Phase two, execute. Get into the gym and put the plan to work. Leave the ego at the door, don't worry about what you can't do, focus on what you can, failure is not an option.


Phase 3, realize the gym is only part of the battle. Work on getting the rest of life in order. Remove distractions, clean up the diet, do some life planning while you are at it.

It is clear that Ross learned to think through where he was going and how he was going to get there. We need to do the same.

ok, off soap box. Have a great day!
GL must spread some reputation around before giving it to bama again.
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:13 AM   #109
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This right here is an epic quote. May be the quote of the year...

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Phase one is to pick your routine. Don't pick it based upon how cool it looks, examine your personal goals and abilities and choose the plan that will best help you reach your goal.
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:27 AM   #110
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This right here is an epic quote. May be the quote of the year...
Awwww shucks.

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