Thread: why goals suck
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Old 10-12-2013, 06:48 AM   #7
Kleurplaay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BendtheBar View Post
My 2 cents...

What most people need is consistency, patience and to actually enjoy what they are doing.

You can set a target but that doesn't mean it's a good target. I've seen hundreds of people set targets on this site. Good or bad target, they never arrive because they like the target more than they like the training.

I personally find my best target is one more rep, one more pound. It keeps me focused on what's important to me: maximizing every workout.
True story. I think (not sure though) that George means that it's way better for your progress to have 'tangible' targets along the way such as: today I'm doing 85kg for 4 sets of 5, or I'm going to bench press 3 times a week, in other words smaller 'goals' where the road to the goal/target is clear. What George is calling a 'goal' here seems to be things like "I want to squat 3 plates", which he thinks isn't as useful because it isn't clear how you want to get there.

Another example would be:

Goal: Reach the top of Mount Everest.
Target: Climb to the top of Mount Everest.

Obviously in this example the goal and target are practically the same, as it is obvious that to reach the top you have to climb it (unless you're going to fly there or some other shenanigans). But in the world of training, it isn't always clear what the best way to reach a goal is. This is why he recommends you set tangible targets along the way, which would in practice strongly relate to what you say is most important: "CONSISTENCY".

Feeling good along the way is crucial aswell. George might say (and I believe him when he says that) that he is a deeply unhappy/messed up person, but he still has that 'feel good' glow when he lifts a ridiculous weight.

Lastly I can say that I personally just feel good when I accomplish something small such as adding 2.5kg to my bench or squatting 1 or 2 extra reps. When I reach a long-term goal I set for myself way back I usually don't enjoy it that much. Usually by then I've already adjusted my goals to a higher weight again. The only real long-term goal I have is: "Become as strong as possible and look the part too".

Last edited by Kleurplaay; 10-12-2013 at 06:51 AM.
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