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Old 09-12-2013, 03:28 PM   #6
Tannhauser
Tannhauser
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The problem isn't his choice of vocabulary (c'mon guys, really? ), it's that what he's saying doesn't make any sense.

Quote:
In that, the central nervous system has autonomic processes which help to stimulate the correct neuromuscular pathways with technique oriented motions, such as the deadlift and squat..
Voluntary movement is initiated by the prefrontal cortex and then activated by messages from the motor cortex. As far as I know, you wouldn't call this an autonomic (automatic) process; that's more correctly applied to processes like breathing. But that aside, fair enough, the CNS controls deadlift and squats, just like it does writing your name or drinking a cup of cocoa.

Quote:
As you continue to progress in these movement patterns and increases in load the central nervous system compensates by essentially triggering the correct muscles to activate at the proper time to maxamize load while minimizing energy expendature.
I'm not sure what he's on about here, though. As the load gets greater, the CNS tries to maximise load? How can the CNS change movement to maximise load? Load on what? And why would it do that? And how would maximising load manage to minimise energy expenditure? I don't get it.

Quote:
By doing 2 sequential complex moves that require proper neuromuscular coordination...
All movements involve proper neuromuscular coordination,including getting up off the couch.

Quote:
... one could expect a technical breakdown of the second motion as well as improper positioning the the first...
OK, I get that it might be difficult to do a complex second motion if you're exhausted from the first. But I can't see how the sequencing of two movements affects the first of these.

Quote:
(i.e. if you squat first then your deadlifts are both compromised in form and weight since these 2 exercises are, technique wise, independent of each other).
But if the movements are independent of each other, why does one compromise the other?

I think that overall, he's just saying that the first exercise will compromise the second. I think it does, to some extent. But after a period of adaptation, it's often less then might be expected, and the benefits of higher frequency can more than offset that.
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