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-   -   Recomping with calorie cycling (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16269)

Soldier 02-03-2014 04:29 PM

Recomping with calorie cycling
 
This is something I've never really tried, partly because I believe that rest days are important too, and I didn't want to cut calories on those days. But I think it's time to give it a try. There are, of course, variations on the theme, but the idea is that calories go a little over maintenance on training days, then a little under on non training days.

I also think that this might work for a slow cut, eating maintenance on training days then creating a deficit on non training days only.

I may give this a test run and possibly use it on my upcoming cycle.

Does anyone have experience with anything like this? How did it work out for you?

BigJosh 02-03-2014 07:23 PM

What would be the difference in calories between a training and non training day?
In regards to a number of calories. (For example 2800 on non training days and 3000 on training days).

Soldier 02-03-2014 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BigJosh (Post 453990)
What would be the difference in calories between a training and non training day?
In regards to a number of calories. (For example 2800 on non training days and 3000 on training days).

Well that's the question, I guess. I'd think it'd be more drastic. I'm thinking it might also help to throw in some carb cycling. So maybe I'd eat almost the same thing, but cut the pre and post workout carbs along with any other carb sources on my rest day. So maybe a 600+ difference between days?

gForce 02-03-2014 08:12 PM

This is a nice overview
http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_..._cycling_codex

Biggraygrizzly 03-05-2014 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Soldier (Post 453923)
This is something I've never really tried, partly because I believe that rest days are important too, and I didn't want to cut calories on those days. But I think it's time to give it a try. There are, of course, variations on the theme, but the idea is that calories go a little over maintenance on training days, then a little under on non training days.

I also think that this might work for a slow cut, eating maintenance on training days then creating a deficit on non training days only.

I may give this a test run and possibly use it on my upcoming cycle.

Does anyone have experience with anything like this? How did it work out for you?

You may want to rotate you Kcal/carb and use the zero method to what weight your trying to get to or know as zig-zag you Kcal/carbs, I would do that when I dieting for a show.

Soldier 03-05-2014 10:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Biggraygrizzly (Post 461770)
You may want to rotate you Kcal/carb and use the zero method to what weight your trying to get to or know as zig-zag you Kcal/carbs, I would do that when I dieting for a show.

I think I have an idea of what you're saying, but what's the zero method?

Soldier 03-05-2014 10:11 PM

By the way, for anyone who cares, I've been using this method successfully now for a couple months. I eat 2500-2800 cals and 150-300g of carbs on training days and around 2000 cals and <20g carbs on non training days. Most of my carbs are consumed during and immediately after training.

BravenFenix 03-06-2014 04:15 AM

The body doesn't work on a 24 hour cycle. It's a waste of time. I did it for a couple years and looking back I just made things more complicated then it needed to be. You want to have eaten well the day of the training session AND the day BEFORE a training session. If you don't have a training session coming up at that point it would make sense to eat less. I train W/F/S and eat like 700 or so less on M since i'm not recovering or have a training session.

Soldier 03-06-2014 09:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BravenFenix (Post 461836)
The body doesn't work on a 24 hour cycle. It's a waste of time. I did it for a couple years and looking back I just made things more complicated then it needed to be. You want to have eaten well the day of the training session AND the day BEFORE a training session. If you don't have a training session coming up at that point it would make sense to eat less. I train W/F/S and eat like 700 or so less on M since i'm not recovering or have a training session.

How dose the body not work on a 24 hour cycle? It's actually the primary cycle that effects our bodies, but that really has nothing to do with it. The body can shift from anabolic to catabolic whenever it needs to, even multiple times a day, so there's no reason to think that the body can't be a little more catabolic one day, then a little more anabolic the next.

It absolutely is helpful to eat big the day before a big PR attempt or a really heavy session, but I'm training with the cube which means I only have 1 heavy day per week. If my goal was to get as strong as possible, then I would be cycling in the first place. The goal is to get as strong as possible while staying at my current weight, while improving aesthetics as well.

BravenFenix 03-06-2014 03:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Soldier (Post 461850)
How dose the body not work on a 24 hour cycle? It's actually the primary cycle that effects our bodies, but that really has nothing to do with it. The body can shift from anabolic to catabolic whenever it needs to, even multiple times a day, so there's no reason to think that the body can't be a little more catabolic one day, then a little more anabolic the next.

It absolutely is helpful to eat big the day before a big PR attempt or a really heavy session, but I'm training with the cube which means I only have 1 heavy day per week. If my goal was to get as strong as possible, then I would be cycling in the first place. The goal is to get as strong as possible while staying at my current weight, while improving aesthetics as well.

We don't absorb all of your food intake 24 hours, if we eat more it takes longer to absorb. Let's just say you would absorb exactly 1500 every 12 hours. This is a totally random number and it's not taking into account varying digestion rates of carbs, fats, proteins. You have 3300 calories, that extra 300 wouldn't be absorbed until the 27-28 hour mark. Basically all it means is you can be couple hundred calories over or under and if you account for it the next day by eating more/less it all balances out. Since muscles remain stimulated for 24-48 hours after they have been trained the over under is irrelevant, net amount is what matters.

As you said you really have one heavy day and since zig zagging doesn't do anything unless you have more than one day off in a row from training. Since you have been doing it you know if you like it better then just going roughly equal calories daily, it's basically an extension of meal timing (1 vs 3 vs 6 meals) it ultimately doesn't matter which is baffling lol. SO I was just saying that if it becomes a pain at some point like it did for me, don't waste sleep or time thinking about it like I did.


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