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-   -   Calf Training (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15333)

bruteforce 10-28-2013 02:15 PM

Calf Training
 
When building your calves, obviously progression is a big deal, just like any other body part. I'm curious about ROM though. Do I need to be using weight light enough that I can get all the way up on my toes for each rep, or go heavy enough that I'm still clearly coming a decent way off the floor but not to that full extension?

MC 10-28-2013 02:20 PM

When I trained calfs more directly, what worked best for me was a straight-legged (like a donkey calf raise) and a bent-kneed (seated) calf raise. I think you may need both. And try to get full extension on both.

big_swede 10-28-2013 02:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bruteforce (Post 421166)
When building your calves, obviously progression is a big deal, just like any other body part. I'm curious about ROM though. Do I need to be using weight light enough that I can get all the way up on my toes for each rep, or go heavy enough that I'm still clearly coming a decent way off the floor but not to that full extension?

I vary, start heavy with limited rom and dropset down to very strict and slow contractions using a light weight. I think its important with full rom.

JumpmanRugs 10-28-2013 02:38 PM

Right now I'm starting to do more as mine had power but lacked behind a bit.

I'm seeing development from doing lighter weights with controlled negatives and time under tension as my focus. Full ROM.

BendtheBar 10-28-2013 07:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MC (Post 421172)
When I trained calfs more directly, what worked best for me was a straight-legged (like a donkey calf raise) and a bent-kneed (seated) calf raise. I think you may need both. And try to get full extension on both.

That's a point I hadn't considered.

Proteinshake03 11-10-2013 07:13 PM

I definitely think a combination of both are helpful. As well as doing high volume sets and low volume heavy weight sets. Full rom is obviously important but even if you don't get quite get full motion at the top as long as your able to get a good squeeze in your calves, but the stretch at the bottom is definitely important, but as you know with anything trial and error.

Iron_Addict82 11-30-2013 06:57 PM

Ive only been training for a year and half but I've found the horizontal hammer strength machine to be awesome. I do 3 sets of 45 with decent weight. I do 15 toes pointed inward, 15 toes straight and 15 toes pointed inward. Now since I'm fairly new to this but I've seen great growth. controlled negatives and a pause at top.

5kgLifter 12-04-2013 06:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bruteforce (Post 421166)
When building your calves, obviously progression is a big deal, just like any other body part. I'm curious about ROM though. Do I need to be using weight light enough that I can get all the way up on my toes for each rep, or go heavy enough that I'm still clearly coming a decent way off the floor but not to that full extension?

I always do full ROM and have no rep range; I take them suckers to burning failure, works a treat.

Several sets to failure, little break, just enough to let the cramping subside ;)

Biggraygrizzly 04-19-2014 05:58 PM

I just posted on which body part lags, I say use a weight heavy to stimulate a burn but light enough to get full range of motion, and when you hit the wall on ROM do partials and my opinion go for the burn that they way to go.

Soldier 04-19-2014 07:33 PM

Full ROM with a slower tempo and no bounce is going to be the best for hypertrophy. Focus on getting a big stretch, pause for a second, then explode up to a full squeeze at the top. People like to talk about going to failure, but honestly, volume and TUT are going to be more important than how painful the set was. 10 sets of 10 that don't hurt are basically the same as 4 sets of 25 with lots of burn, and the work can be done in almost the same amount of time because much less recovery time will be needed between sets.


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