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-   -   Long Term Goals - Consistancy vs. Specialization (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9082)

BendtheBar 02-21-2012 09:47 PM

Long Term Goals - Consistancy vs. Specialization
 
Consistancy vs. Specialization

What are your opinions on the two training methods for lifetime goals?


#1. Use a well rounded routine and work for years to bring up all the lifts. You will realize all your goals at the end of the long journey.
#2. Work specifically on one or two lifts at a time until they reach their potential, then work on a couple of different lifts. You will have achieved many goals at different times.

bamazav 02-21-2012 10:06 PM

One of the things I like about 5/3/1 is that you can bring up multiple lifts with consistency. Consistency is the operative word with any routine. Any routine can see you to gains if you are consistent and progressive.

Off Road 02-21-2012 10:29 PM

The reason I like this question is there is really difference between what is recommended today and what some of the old time lifters used to do. Many of the old time lifters used to spend a few years on something, get really good at it, set some records, then move on to something else.

BendtheBar 02-21-2012 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Off Road (Post 218776)
The reason I like this question is there is really difference between what is recommended today and what some of the old time lifters used to do. Many of the old time lifters used to spend a few years on something, get really good at it, set some records, then move on to something else.

That open such interesting doors to me. While this isn't answering the question directly, I would like to say that I can see why this is appealing. At some point the big lifts can get rather frustrating. At this point I guess the question becomes...put 75% of my energy into one lift and place the others in a holding pattern, or push all 3 at once.

There certainly are plenty of lifters who effectively raise all 3 at once, but this does not mean that specialization wouldn't be a good option.

Mentally I find myself currently drawn to specialization. I have a passion for bringing up my deadlift, and may just give it a heavier focus at the expense of bench and squats after my next meet.

My personal view is that a trainee should continue working on all lifts and building well rounded strength until they start to hit challenging walls at about the 5 rep range, meaning it becomes very hard to make any progress around 85% of their 1RM and below.

After this point more intense work is most likely needed, and depending on a lifters goals, specialization might be a fun option.

MikeM 03-01-2012 12:04 AM

I believe Ryano's insight in this question might be extremely incisive.

I think for some it just depends on what floats your boat. Do you want to be overall strong so that in your gym/club/meets you're a big man on whatever lifts are expected? Or do you love one thing and want to hammer it out to it's ultimate?


Me, I got started because I wanted to clean and press my BW. But along the way I found I liked just picking up heavy stuff no matter what.

And I love balance. I would dearly love to military my BW, but I also really want to do 10 pullups too.

Bottom line, I think this answer comes from within.


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