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-   -   Your Thoughts on Hardgainers (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=270)

BendtheBar 07-09-2009 07:35 PM

Your Thoughts on Hardgainers
 
Do you believe most hardgainers are hardgainers?

Or do you believe that 6 months of proper eating, progression of weight, and heavy squatting can change most hardgainers into muscle growing machines?

I believe that most lifters who think they are hardgainers aren't training or eating right. With that said, I do believe that true hardgainers exist. But I believe 80% of Internet hardgainers aren't true hardgainers at all.

What say you?

I lifted for 3 years in my teens and never made any progress. I thought I was a hardgainer. Then I learned eating, progression and squatting.

RickB 07-09-2009 07:47 PM

I believe there are different levels of metabolism and some people (myself included when I was younger) could eat ANYTHING and not gain any fat. Now I wasn't tearing my self down in the gym back then, nor was I eating as often as a hardgainer trying to get big should. But merely stating that I think hardgainers have a fast metabolism and you need to eat to out run it! And I think it's very possible if they are disciplined enough.

BendtheBar 07-09-2009 08:06 PM

I agree Rick. I weighed 145 at age 17, and looked pathetic. I learned to out eat my metabolism.

I also think that many men in their teens and early 20's have such a high metabolism that it becomes difficult to eat too much. That is where the need for smart food comes it...calorie dense whole milk, etc.

I trained a "hardgainer" in college. He was a twig, and couldn't gain. The first thing I did was to have him stop running, and all other forms of cardio. Then I taught him about progression. Next, I introduced him to fried foods, whole milk, and the dessert bar.

He gained 10 pounds of weight in a month.

maokoto 07-13-2009 02:30 AM

I myself am sort of a "hardgainer". I lose weight on two or three days of reduced calories eating.

However it is not so difficult to gain. I remember 5 years ago, when I was running marathons and switched to weight training. For months it is was impossible for me to raise above 80-82 kg (180 lbs), until I decided to take nutrition as another training. I began to eat far beyond satiety, drink milk instead of water and go eat something every 2-3 hours. I soon broke the barrier and raised my weight.

BendtheBar 07-13-2009 05:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maokoto (Post 1179)
I myself am sort of a "hardgainer". I lose weight on two or three days of reduced calories eating.

However it is not so difficult to gain. I remember 5 years ago, when I was running marathons and switched to weight training. For months it is was impossible for me to raise above 80-82 kg (180 lbs), until I decided to take nutrition as another training. I began to eat far beyond satiety, drink milk instead of water and go eat something every 2-3 hours. I soon broke the barrier and raised my weight.

Welcome to the forum.

Your post made me think about how many trainees there must be out there that make no gains at all. I'm sure there's a good share of them, and most of them could benefit from doing exactly what you did.

Was there something that triggered your switch to milk and eating more? ...like reading about the 20 rep squat and whole milk routine, or did you just get frustrated and give it a try?

Learning to out eat your metabolism can be a tough thing to do.

maokoto 07-14-2009 04:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuscleandBrawn (Post 1181)
Was there something that triggered your switch to milk and eating more? ...like reading about the 20 rep squat and whole milk routine, or did you just get frustrated and give it a try?

Well, in that time I did not read as much as I do now. I didnīt read about "squats & milk". I only knew I was an ectomorph and knew that at a height of 1,79 cm I have to weight at least 85 Kg or more to have a muscle to show.

It was gradually. I only have to make a bit of effort to eat to get from 76Kg to 80Kg, but then stalled and decided to go all out.

JesseA 07-20-2009 07:54 PM

I do think there is such a thing as a hardgainer, but it's just a matter of out-eating your metabolism. I was extremely scrawny most of my life, but I felt like I was eating enough food (I did not feel hungry very often).
Until the age of 31, I weighed about 127-130 (at 5'11+"). I've been active by playing sports and keeping active most of my life, but never felt I could gain weight. When I was a teenager I lifted weights but with the attention span of a toddler, after not getting results in a few days/weeks, I threw in the towel.

Well, that was three years ago, now I'm about 188-190. The first 30 pounds was pretty easy, within about 9 months of training I had hit 150, and finally felt 'normal'.
I had to eat until I felt like puking, it's gotten better now, but if I drop back to a 'normal' diet, I start shedding pounds pretty quickly. unfortunately, it doesn't seem like my bodyfat levels drop when those few pounds come off.

In three years I have not really done any 'cutting' as I'm afraid to lose the muscle and strength gains I've worked so hard for, but I have accumulated more abdominal fat than I would prefer.

BendtheBar 07-21-2009 05:25 AM

You've touched on a key point...hardgainers should really consider dropping all forms of cardio for a while.

One nice thing about gaining muscle, is that if you do lose it, it comes back quicker.

Jesse...have you read the book, "Better then Steroids"? Ignore the silly title...it actually is a great diet/cutting book for bodybuilders and has a variety of different dieting approaches.

JesseA 07-21-2009 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MuscleandBrawn (Post 1463)
You've touched on a key point...hardgainers should really consider dropping all forms of cardio for a while.

One nice thing about gaining muscle, is that if you do lose it, it comes back quicker.

Jesse...have you read the book, "Better then Steroids"? Ignore the silly title...it actually is a great diet/cutting book for bodybuilders and has a variety of different dieting approaches.

Yup, I rarely do any dedicated cardio work. Actually I went mountain biking for the first time in three years (since I started lifting) yesterday. But I'm down about 1 1/2 pounds today.

I've not read that book. I'll take a look at it though, it does sound interesting. Most of what I've read are just short articles on cutting/bulking cycles. It'd be nice to have a more complete resource.

BendtheBar 07-21-2009 04:13 PM

I don't often recommend books, but it is worth a read. You won't agree with everything he says, but there is enough in there to get you motivated and experimenting.


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