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-   -   Floor Presses vs. Flat Bench (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9941)

BendtheBar 05-11-2012 12:00 PM

Floor Presses vs. Flat Bench
 
Did floor presses for the first time yesterday and have a few general questions.

--Where does your floor press strength fall in comparison to your flat bench strength?

--Do you floor press knees up and use any drive?

--Do you bring elbows all the way down, or is it more of a touch and go?

J_Byrd 05-11-2012 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 240525)
Did floor presses for the first time yesterday and have a few general questions.

--Where does your floor press strength fall in comparison to your flat bench strength?

--Do you floor press knees up and use any drive?

--Do you bring elbows all the way down, or is it more of a touch and go?

Strength is going to comparable, but will differ from person to person. I would think it would be within 30lbs or so.

I dont think you want to use much leg drive, but I have seen it done both ways. I think you just have to find what works best for you.

I just like to let the back of my tris hit, just before my elbow. I saw a recent video where Mark Bell said he likes to let his rest on the ground for a second before the press.

And yes....I gave you a reply that pretty much said nothing :(

BendtheBar 05-11-2012 12:22 PM

I stopped about 30 pounds shy of my bench working weight, as was doing mostly touch and go with the triceps. Felt fine, so I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing anything important.

J_Byrd 05-11-2012 12:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 240538)
I stopped about 30 pounds shy of my bench working weight, as was doing mostly touch and go with the triceps. Felt fine, so I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing anything important.

Well that is how I do it

Rich Knapp 05-11-2012 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 240525)
Did floor presses for the first time yesterday and have a few general questions.

--Where does your floor press strength fall in comparison to your flat bench strength?

--Do you floor press knees up and use any drive?

--Do you bring elbows all the way down, or is it more of a touch and go?

1. A floor press starting point, you no longer use your Lats like you do on a normal press.

2. Thats a personal choice, I used to do them up and feet flat.

3. Down as far as my Tri's allow me to go.

Floor presses are a great tool to break threw a mid press sticky spot.
:rockon:

5kgLifter 05-11-2012 01:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 240525)
Did floor presses for the first time yesterday and have a few general questions.

--Where does your floor press strength fall in comparison to your flat bench strength?

--Do you floor press knees up and use any drive?

--Do you bring elbows all the way down, or is it more of a touch and go?

Have only ever done 1 bench press (:o) and used higher loads to do it, after doing floor presses off buckets; whether the load was higher because I trusted the set-up more, I don't know for sure, but I managed to press it. So, for me, I'd say that floor presses are slightly weaker. Like I said though, having only done one bench press, I can't really compare them yet.

Don't use leg drive, just brace the core tightly.

Arms down until they touch the floor, then press.

LtL 05-11-2012 01:53 PM

Think of the floor press as a box squat for your bench, so triceps fully on the floor and relaxed before exploding up.

I use a little leg drive but try not to cheat too much. Butt probably comes a little off the floor but not enough to walk under if you know what I mean.

As for comparing strength between the two: I am pretty close between the two as the bar comes quite close to my chest. I am probably 10kgs higher on floor press.

LtL


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