Muscle and Brawn Forums

Muscle and Brawn Forums (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forums/index.php)
-   Powerlifting & Strength Training (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=36)
-   -   Big numbers (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8913)

Davis 02-07-2012 05:19 PM

Big numbers
 
I think for the average guy a 300 squat, 200 bench and 400 deadlift are all pretty achievable, but what about big numbers?

I don't have a list that constitutes big numbers, but a 550, 365, and 600+ seems like they are different animals than just lifting and eating . If I'm right, what comes more into play? I'm curious to know what you all think.

PS I got to a 300+ squat with relative ease and plateaued for a long time until I improved my technique and abdominal strength. That's how I got the idea of needing "something more".

BendtheBar 02-07-2012 05:22 PM

I think 300, 400, 500 is a pretty substantial achievement for raw naturals. I also believe most people should expect to get there (or close), depending on their goals.

Quote:

but a 550, 365, and 600+
Some of it is luck, some time, some an unwillingness to quit.

Most people won't have the patience or fortitude to stick around and hit a 1500 raw natural total. The transition from 1200 to 1500 may require many things people are unwilling to do...working excessively on form, making tweaks, training around injuries.

But if you are serious about powerlifting and stick with it I think you should expect a 1400-1500 total at some point.

Fazc 02-07-2012 05:39 PM

Usually the difference between a guy who Squats 500 and a guy who Squats 200 is a good 3-5 years of solid, consistent graft in the gym.

The longer I train the more I find myself agreeing with Btb's sentiment there. It really is just a matter of time and a consistent willingness to push yourself month after month. Being able to keep that level of enthusiasm and energy toward something which, let's face it, isn't a matter of survival for us. Our lives don't depend on whether we Squat 500, we do it because we love it. It really is a labour of love, why do you think people get so passionate about lifting on these forums. To sustain that love for years upon years requires effort. To pick yourself back up from game ending injuries and then come back even stronger requires mental fortitude. The type of fortitude that makes your goals an inevitability. To have the will to organise your life so that when the time comes that other priorities in life are more important (and trust me, they will be) that you don't completely leave your training goals behind. The younger guys might not understand that one, but trust me you will one day.

Every guy who trains through all that and still puts in the graft after sometimes, decades of lifting is the kind of guy who will reach his goals, who will find a way.

miked96 02-07-2012 05:49 PM

Great posts guys and you said it. Consistency and time. I also recommend training with people stronger than you. When you see guys squatting and pulling 5-700 and benching over 400 then you raise your expectations. When I first pulled 500 guys were happy for me but it was no big deal. It was expected.

Off Road 02-07-2012 05:59 PM

It's all a matter of time and consistancy. The consistancy is pretty standard between all lifters, you have to put in the work every week. But the time difference can be huge between lifters. Some guys will fly up to a 300 lb squat while it may take others a few years to get there. Then to add another 100 lbs may take even longer. The guys that are most consistant or gain faster will have a better chance of putting up huge numbers. Those that gain more slowly or don't remain consistant may have to settle for personal battles and smaller achievable goals. But it really doesn't matter; even the really strong guys respect the efforts of the weaker guys. We are all busting our butts on a consistant basis. Be the best you can be.

BendtheBar 02-07-2012 06:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by miked96 (Post 214873)
I also recommend training with people stronger than you. When you see guys squatting and pulling 5-700 and benching over 400 then you raise your expectations. When I first pulled 500 guys were happy for me but it was no big deal. It was expected.

This is a really good point. When you are around people doing things that are superhuman to you it elevates the bar in ways that are hard to explain.

Davis 02-07-2012 11:16 PM

Great posts, everyone. For me, I'm the strongest I know of guys that I lift with other than on the bench. I just suck at benching. Sure, I know of guys stronger than me around me, but I won't change my schedule to lift with them. (When I decide on something, I sick to that until it's time to change)

As for Fazc on priorities...word. It seems a lot of kids, myself included, want to make lifting number one when in reality we aren't at the point it needs to be. Over the past two months, I've began to realize this. Yes, I'd like to be the world's strongest man, but I'd also like to support myself as a working musician and manual laborer if need be. Obviously, music has to come first.

Fazc 02-08-2012 02:33 AM

You talk a lot of sense Davis.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Davis (Post 214986)
Great posts, everyone. For me, I'm the strongest I know of guys that I lift with other than on the bench. I just suck at benching.

I'll tell you something else. For the first 3 years of my training life I had no more than a 220lbs Bench max. Nothing I did was enough to raise it higher than that, and often it would fall down to 200lbs. That was 3 consistent years of training too, and I actually competed once or twice in that period.

Last year I did 220lbs as a back off set of 18 (with no supportive gear), as well as a max effort with 340lbs. I've Benched over 400lbs with support also. Your early efforts are no indication other than to show that you have the tenacity to stick with it.

Kuytrider 02-08-2012 06:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fazc (Post 214998)
You talk a lot of sense Davis.



I'll tell you something else. For the first 3 years of my training life I had no more than a 220lbs Bench max. Nothing I did was enough to raise it higher than that, and often it would fall down to 200lbs. That was 3 consistent years of training too, and I actually competed once or twice in that period.

Last year I did 220lbs as a back off set of 18 (with no supportive gear), as well as a max effort with 340lbs. I've Benched over 400lbs with support also. Your early efforts are no indication other than to show that you have the tenacity to stick with it.

I'll try and remember this everytime I stall, especially on the squat.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:51 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.