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-   -   Trap Bar Deadlift Use (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7781)

BendtheBar 11-01-2011 12:05 PM

Trap Bar Deadlift Use
 
Simple question...not trying to lead you to any specific answer.

Would you recommend hex bar deadlifts to a non-powerlifting trainee who is looking to build muscle, before they have a decent working understanding of squat and deadlift form/mechanics?

Shadowschmadow 11-01-2011 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 185423)
Would you recommend hex bar deadlifts to a non-powerlifting trainee who is looking to build muscle, before they have a decent working understanding of squat and deadlift form/mechanics?

No, for that reason. After, sure, why not...

To me, a trap bar deadlift is just another variation of deads. It takes emphasis off the lower back and increases emphasis on legs. But to do any variation of a deadlift without understanding how/why to do a deadlift doesn't make sense.

ricka182 11-01-2011 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 185423)
Simple question...not trying to lead you to any specific answer.

Would you recommend hex bar deadlifts to a non-powerlifting trainee who is looking to build muscle, before they have a decent working understanding of squat and deadlift form/mechanics?

Nope. Last part is why I say no. Form/mechanics are important beyond belief, especially for squat and deadlifts.

J_Byrd 11-01-2011 12:15 PM

For what purpose? Used as an auxiliary movement (shrugs) I wouldn't have an issue. From my personal experience, trap/hex bars tend to create a lot of rounding in the back. I feel its more dangerous of a lift for a beginner than the straight bar. Also don't feel it promotes the same levers that are used in every day strength training.

Shadowschmadow 11-01-2011 12:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J_Byrd (Post 185434)
From my personal experience, trap/hex bars tend to create a lot of rounding in the back. I feel its more dangerous of a lift for a beginner than the straight bar.

This is largely going to be related to how the individual sits for a pull. If anything, the lower back should be less likely to round because you begin your pull from a higher starting point. Which means you don't have to squat down as far. With a trapbar deadlift, your torso angle will/should be higher. This is what takes emphasis off the back and places it on the legs.

Not to say that trap bar deadlifts do not work your lower back.

Soldier 11-01-2011 12:19 PM

Absolutely. If you tell someone to get their butt down, push through their heals and lift with their legs and they actually listen, the trap bar dead lift will be much easier than a traditional dead lift or back squat.

I don't get not having someone do it just because they are a beginner. It's one of the easiest lifts to get right, kind of like goblet squats, and will actively reinforce the correct movements they will need once they start working with a traidtional bar.

austin.j.taylor 11-01-2011 12:28 PM

I would if I could teach them how to do it and that it is NOT a deadlift substitute. hex bar deadlift is more like a hack squat than a deadlift.

J_Byrd 11-01-2011 12:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shadow (Post 185437)
This is largely going to be related to how the individual sits for a pull. If anything, the lower back should be less likely to round because you begin your pull from a higher starting point. Which means you don't have to squat down as far. With a trapbar deadlift, your torso angle will/should be higher. This is what takes emphasis off the back and places it on the legs.

Not to say that trap bar deadlifts do not work your lower back.

From my experience every person who gets into a trap bar bows the back in the initial pull from the hips driving back rather than up. I threw the ones from our weight room in storage. Total junk in my opinion. If I am taking the time to teach someone to lift, I wouldn't waist my time on it.

Mr.Silverback 11-01-2011 12:38 PM

In my experience with a Hex Bar, it is more of a squat than a deadlift because it positions the weight around center mass much like a Spider Bar or Cambered variation. Its not a bad auxiliary movement, just I personally wouldn't make it the end all. Its another ego boosting exercise that I see many use as an excuse to NOT do straight bar deads. Of course just my personal opinion. I would definitely explain that its good to help bring up the squat or dead, but not the basis that a program should be designed around.

Soldier 11-01-2011 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J_Byrd (Post 185456)
From my experience every person who gets into a trap bar bows the back in the initial pull from the hips driving back rather than up. I threw the ones from our weight room in storage. Total junk in my opinion. If I am taking the time to teach someone to lift, I wouldn't waist my time on it.

I retract my former statement, as it's obvious that those with more experience training others haven't seen good results with this movement.

I'd go with the voice of experience that this isn't a good one for people just starting out.


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