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-   -   Leg Curls, Squats and Hamstring Strains (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6613)

BendtheBar 06-22-2011 09:22 AM

Leg Curls, Squats and Hamstring Strains
 
This might be an odd coincidence, but 3-4 times a year I receive a hamstring strain when squatting, and it's usually when I am also currently using (fairly heavily) leg curls.

It's to the point where I am concerned about using isolation-style hamstring work.

The strain usually occurs in my later warm up sets when the weight is still relatively light (275-315). I always take my time in warming up, and ramp slowly.

Just wondering if any of you have any thoughts on this...

Carl1174 06-22-2011 09:49 AM

I dont think I have ever strained my Hammies, but I just don't like hamstring isolation stuff at all to be honest. Just always feels a bit awkward !

Carl.

LtL 06-22-2011 11:18 AM

Every leg curl machine I have tried has felt unnatural. I have been doing banded leg curls and they feel great. Much more natural movement.

LtL

Isaku900 06-22-2011 03:03 PM

leg curls are virtually useless for strength applications. the same can be applied to leg extensions.

open chain exercises are fine for rehab, but they are really bad for strength, they tend to promote shearing forces on your joints at any appreciable load.

Aurik 06-22-2011 03:07 PM

You're right there, Steve. The times I get charley horses in my hamstrings it's the day after I've done brutal leg curls. I've never strained a hamstring while squatting or DL'ing though... it's always the day after.

Shadowschmadow 06-22-2011 03:57 PM

What kind of strain are you talking about? Do you feel as though your hamstrings are under-worked possibly?

MonsterMike 06-23-2011 10:26 AM

I have a training partner who actually has the same thing....I haven't really sat back to think about/analyze the issue....I usually say....use exercises other than a straight leg curl to strengthen the hams.....If I am doing hams, I want the whole posterior chain to be firing as well, especially if I am trying to squat big.....that way there are no muscular weaknesses anywhere else....maybe try box squatting (its a good test for ham strength bc its essentially a leg curl if you are doing it right)....if you have trouble box squatting properly....start with some goodmornings and then move to GHRs....if you dont have a GHR, you can always dp them the old fashion way with a pad on the floor. obviously if I cat see video or be there when you are working out, I can't really say much...But now that I am thinking about it...I would guess with my training partner that he is wearing out his hams to the point his technique on the squat breaks down and causes the injury...might not be the same with you, but could be a factor. hope this helps!

BendtheBar 06-23-2011 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Shadow (Post 147298)
What kind of strain are you talking about? Do you feel as though your hamstrings are under-worked possibly?

Immediately tenderness.

If you ever have hamstring DOMS the day after squatting, it feels almost like this, but happens immediately.

I walk the line with exercises like this. As most of you know I use them very infrequently. When I do I generally regret it.

BendtheBar 06-23-2011 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonsterMike (Post 147479)
I have a training partner who actually has the same thing....I haven't really sat back to think about/analyze the issue....I usually say....use exercises other than a straight leg curl to strengthen the hams.....If I am doing hams, I want the whole posterior chain to be firing as well, especially if I am trying to squat big.....that way there are no muscular weaknesses anywhere else....maybe try box squatting (its a good test for ham strength bc its essentially a leg curl if you are doing it right)....if you have trouble box squatting properly....start with some goodmornings and then move to GHRs....if you dont have a GHR, you can always dp them the old fashion way with a pad on the floor. obviously if I cat see video or be there when you are working out, I can't really say much...But now that I am thinking about it...I would guess with my training partner that he is wearing out his hams to the point his technique on the squat breaks down and causes the injury...might not be the same with you, but could be a factor. hope this helps!

In the past I stuck with wide stance good mornings, sumo RDLs and RDLs. Early last year I strained my hip with heavy RDLs so I started dabbling back with leg curls on and off.

In hind site it was a bad decision. I probably should have just stuck with good mornings.

Thanks for the post. I have gotten away from box squats for a couple of years. It might be time to pull my head out of my ass again.

Shadowschmadow 06-23-2011 10:53 AM

Sounds like an odd one. Looking from the outside in, it sounds like either your hammies are over worked at the moment, or lack of proper warm up; but you already stated that you take your time warming up.

- Does this seem to be a reoccuring then when you begin ramping up the intensity of your sessions?
- Does taking time off seem to be a remedy?

I'm not a huge fan of heavy hamstring curls, or hamstring curls in general. I personally don't have access to these currently, but GHR is an excellent exercise, and if your program will allow SLDL. The only issue with heavy RDLs/SLDLs is that it can interfere with recovery if you deadlift regularly, which I'm sure you do. The DLs don't even need to be overly heavy, because there main focus will be directly on the hamstring which should result in a greater tension than they're used to.

Your well educated big guy, so your guess is as good as mine. Only thing I can really say is to try taking some time off, drop hamstring curls and walk 10-15 minutes before you begin squatting.


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