Muscle and Brawn Forums

Muscle and Brawn Forums (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/index.php)
-   Powerlifting & Strength Training (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=36)
-   -   Foundation of Speed (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12378)

Davis 02-01-2013 11:52 PM

Foundation of Speed
 
Over the last few months of lifting again on a highly inconsistent basis, I've learned a few things, but only one is worth mentioning in THIS thread. That would be speed.

In the past, I worked on speed in my deadlift a lot. Leverage benefits and decent technique aside, it was my best lift. I always tried to lift that off the ground explosively.(And I also killed myself on deadlift day week after week) The other lifts? Not so much.

So, since November(maybe October) when I had to start out really light on everything, I decided to focus on two things: Speed and technique. Techniques in each lift were fairly solid. Well, better than most guys in the gym I've seen- even after not lifting for a few months. Speed was something I knew I had previously lacked in the squat and bench. Deadlift and press speed were not too bad and still remained with me. So...I focused on speed in the bench and squat.

What I've found over this roller coaster of inconsistent lifting is that after focusing so much speed into my squat and bench, I have maintained a lot of speed and allowing me to start back at my previous weights even if it's been a few weeks since I've last trained that lift. Given, the weights are fairly light compared to what I used to move, and they could be heavier had I been more consistent lately, but I have never moved these weights so quickly.

Examples: Previously, my best squat was 385 I believe. Maybe 380. Doesn't matter. When I squatted 225 during that time, I did not move 225 pounds as quickly or as easily as I do now. Same with bench. My best bench was 230, but I could not move 155 as easily as I do now. Both lifts obviously have a lower one rep max.

What could this be? For one, better technique. I focused on it some. Secondly, I focused a lot on being as quick and explosive as possible on these two lifts, but I did not in my past.

Though it has been proven many times, speed is a huge key in strength and ease of movement. At least, that's my belief. From now on, anytime I go in and lift, each rep will be as quick as I can make it.

What does MaB think?

sleepingdog 02-02-2013 01:14 AM

I think this is a great idea for people to add to their lifting toolbox. I would caution that control and technique still be emphasized. New lifters may get overzealous, or try to increase the speed of a lift they aren't full in control of yet, risking injury. I am in overall agreement, as I try to get an explosive movement on my big compounds.

Soldier 02-02-2013 09:37 AM

One of my favorite ways to set up a session for strength is to work slowly up to a heavy triple, deuce, or even a single. Not a full max, but very close. Then I go back down to something around 65-75% for 4-6 sets of 3 or 4 reps, but I focus on speed and form. Working up to heavy weights first primes your CNS to fire more fibers and also warms you up, which makes the lighter weight seem like nothing, and makes it very easy to explode hard.

A session like this also doesn't burn you out like a stricly heavy session. I train with high frequency, usually doing either deadlift, squat, or a combination of the 2 every other day. Combining heavy sessions with lighter, more explosive sessions is the only way to train with that kind of frequency.

BendtheBar 02-02-2013 11:23 AM

Quote:

What could this be?
My guess is that you are stronger, and have improved form and confidence, so things feel lighter.

If you have been working on speed, you've been working on power input and probably building strength.

jdmalm123 02-02-2013 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sleepingdog (Post 319967)
I think this is a great idea for people to add to their lifting toolbox. I would caution that control and technique still be emphasized. New lifters may get overzealous, or try to increase the speed of a lift they aren't full in control of yet, risking injury. I am in overall agreement, as I try to get an explosive movement on my big compounds.

Agree.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Soldier (Post 320001)
One of my favorite ways to set up a session for strength is to work slowly up to a heavy triple, deuce, or even a single. Not a full max, but very close. Then I go back down to something around 65-75% for 4-6 sets of 3 or 4 reps, but I focus on speed and form. Working up to heavy weights first primes your CNS to fire more fibers and also warms you up, which makes the lighter weight seem like nothing, and makes it very easy to explode hard.

A session like this also doesn't burn you out like a stricly heavy session. I train with high frequency, usually doing either deadlift, squat, or a combination of the 2 every other day. Combining heavy sessions with lighter, more explosive sessions is the only way to train with that kind of frequency.

Also, agree. Just like heavier weights recruit more fibers, so does speed work. It also recruits the fiber types that are most directly linked to muscular development.

Davis 02-02-2013 04:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 320037)
My guess is that you are stronger, and have improved form and confidence, so things feel lighter.

If you have been working on speed, you've been working on power input and probably building strength.

Then Monday I will squat 415 pounds... OK, maybe not. I'm a bit confused at what you mean, Steve. You're saying I'm stronger, but my max lifts are of course down from where they were in the past. Are you implying that I have more potential for maximal strength now?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:20 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.