Muscle and Brawn Forums

Muscle and Brawn Forums (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/index.php)
-   Powerlifting & Strength Training (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=36)
-   -   Heavy, but not heavy? (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11955)

Davis 12-18-2012 12:32 PM

Heavy, but not heavy?
 
As I try to get my strength levels back, I seem to be noticing something. Weights that are much lower(say maybe 60% of my old working sets or even best lifts) might be hard, but they don't necessarily feel heavy. Example: 275 3x3 on the deadlift Thursday night. I've done 390 3x3 a few times, and I think I may have even done this with 405, but I'm not sure...I think I tried and failed. So I sort of struggled with the 275, but it didn't actually feel heavy. (And the hardest part was my grip, DOH)

Does this make sense? Is this normal?

Fazc 12-18-2012 12:38 PM

Quote:

So I sort of struggled with the 275
So add some weight on?

Squatter 12-18-2012 12:45 PM

Was form a bit rusty? Maybe that is why they felt hard but not too heavy. Grip will come along with the progression. Be careful tho with the grip slipping as it may cause an injury. A viable option is to do sets with reps with Versagripps.

Davis 12-18-2012 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fazc (Post 302741)
So add some weight on?

I was going to do that next time I went in to deadlift...which is today. Although, yes, good suggestion.

Squatter, a few things mobility related has hurt it some, I know that. It'll come back soon. I'm curious as to how and where the grip slipping can cause injury. I've not heard of it. Other than maybe dropping the bar somewhere it doesn't need to be. Injury in the hands or arm possible?

Fazc 12-18-2012 12:53 PM

I came back from no-training for a year in 2006. I tried to do a little too much and ripped my hamstring and took 3-4 years to recover from that. So I understand the desire to rebuild slowly. I didn't mean to put your efforts down.

Ultimately I don't think it's healthy to concentrate on the details especially as you come back. So my go-to response to your question would be, does it really matter? Just focus on small, gradual weight increases. Stick to high reps and lift often but keep some in the tank. You'll be fine, just as long as you avoid doing anything crazy while coming back from inactivity.

5kgLifter 12-18-2012 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fazc (Post 302749)
I came back from no-training for a year in 2006. I tried to do a little too much and ripped my hamstring and took 3-4 years to recover from that. So I understand the desire to rebuild slowly. I didn't mean to put your efforts down.

Ultimately I don't think it's healthy to concentrate on the details especially as you come back. So my go-to response to your question would be, does it really matter? Just focus on small, gradual weight increases. Stick to high reps and lift often but keep some in the tank. You'll be fine, just as long as you avoid doing anything crazy while coming back from inactivity.

Yep! You may have to basically consider yourself a "new" beginner whether you like it or not, especially if the body is deconditioned either in the lifting or cardio area all dependant on how long it has been sice you lifted last. Safer than sorry, is the best bet, and it never takes long to rebuild which is great.

5kgLifter 12-18-2012 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fazc (Post 302749)
I came back from no-training for a year in 2006. I tried to do a little too much and ripped my hamstring and took 3-4 years to recover from that. So I understand the desire to rebuild slowly. I didn't mean to put your efforts down.

Ultimately I don't think it's healthy to concentrate on the details especially as you come back. So my go-to response to your question would be, does it really matter? Just focus on small, gradual weight increases. Stick to high reps and lift often but keep some in the tank. You'll be fine, just as long as you avoid doing anything crazy while coming back from inactivity.

Yep! You may have to basically consider yourself a "new" beginner whether you like it or not, especially if the body is deconditioned either in the lifting or cardio area all dependant on how long it has been since you lifted last. Safer than sorry, is the best bet, and it never takes long to rebuild which is great.

Fazc 12-18-2012 01:15 PM

Yeah consider yourself a beginner again, and to that end I hope you're lifting little and often as opposed to a lot once a week. You need to build up your conditioning and general muscle mass before you plough into anything too severe.

Full body three times a week would be ideal.

I WILL 12-18-2012 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fazc (Post 302749)
I came back from no-training for a year in 2006. I tried to do a little too much and ripped my hamstring and took 3-4 years to recover from that. So I understand the desire to rebuild slowly. I didn't mean to put your efforts down.

Ultimately I don't think it's healthy to concentrate on the details especially as you come back. So my go-to response to your question would be, does it really matter? Just focus on small, gradual weight increases. Stick to high reps and lift often but keep some in the tank. You'll be fine, just as long as you avoid doing anything crazy while coming back from inactivity.

agreed:) take your time and u will be amazed @ your comeback


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:52 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.