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-   -   Gaining strength for boxing? (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11196)

datboi 09-24-2012 06:34 PM

Gaining strength for boxing?
 
Im 16, 5,6, 133, and athletic, somewhat ripped (most people say im skinny, but when i flex im buff) what i need is a workout that will

-help me increase punching power?
- do i need more muscle, mass, or strength to be a more effective boxer?
-im also not looking to get HUGE im looking to be a strong boxer, but still light so i'll have my speed, i would'nt want to push 160ish..think the antagonist from never back down (ryan mccarthy), any help would be appreciated

to get out confusion, i want to be strong as in able to lift alot, have strong/fast punches, but not get huge to where its expected, defined muscles..ill need a lower and upper body workout that i could do maybe 5 days a week? ill even do 6

My equipment is a bench press, squat rack, calf raise, dumbells ranging from 5s to 105, treadmill, ill edit this tomorrow when i go back and get to look at it,

BendtheBar 09-24-2012 07:05 PM

You definitely need more strength, but you will not need to lift weights 6 days per week to reach your goals.

What equipment do you have access to and what is your current height?

Regarding getting "too huge"...that's not going to happen, so no need to worry about it.

datboi 09-24-2012 07:19 PM

Im 5´6 and yeah i know i wont get huge haha, i mean like those people who´s muscles are too big that it makes them a slow puncher..i guess i want to be lean...alot of strength without sacrificing my speed and size, my ideal weight would be 170

BendtheBar 09-24-2012 07:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by datboi (Post 279535)
Im 5´6 and yeah i know i wont get huge haha, i mean like those people who´s muscles are too big that it makes them a slow puncher..i guess i want to be lean...alot of strength without sacrificing my speed and size, my ideal weight would be 170

You'll never get "too" huge. That requires excessive amounts of performance enhancing drugs and a lot of time so put that notion out of your head.

170 is a good goal for you're height.

Here is an 8 week workout that can get you introduced to weight training:


8 Week Novice Quick Start Workout Plan | Muscle & Strength

Let me know if you have any questions.

datboi 09-24-2012 07:53 PM

Im not a beginner in working out, i played football where we did the standard bench, military press, deadlifts thing, and lower body squats and whatnot...the reason im so skinny now is because i did heavy cardio along with bodyweight exercises, i was in basketball at the time.

datboi 09-24-2012 07:54 PM

Didnt mean for that to come off rude, i meant im not a beginner, but im certainly not a pro...probably someone inbetween begineer and knows what hes doing

leefarley 09-26-2012 01:28 PM

punching power what you talk is developed through learning proper technique and practicing that technique through hours and hours of training not by lifting weights all tho that will help with strength,you need to find a boxing coach.

bruteforce 09-26-2012 01:52 PM

Power comes from the base. Build a strong core and brutal legs. I'll let Jim Wendler take it from here.

Below is an article from Jim Wendler posted at T NATION | The Intelligent and Relentless Pursuit of Muscle

A how-to guide to keeping the predators at bay.
During an academic conversation with my friend Matt Vincent, the issue of being strong and awesome came up as a topic, as it always does. Matt shares a lot of the same ideas about training, life and our love of our big Bear friend, Jason Pegg. Two topics were of note. The first was how to avoid being raped and the second was how to train if we knew the apocalypse was coming. This spill is on the former.

First, you gotta have some strength in the legs and hips . This is paramount when you initially have to take an athletic stance to not be thrown down. Keep the legs strong and bent and in an athletic position. You need to learn to brace yourself against the agitator. Solution: Squats and Deadlifts

Second, you need to combine this lower body work with strong shoulders and lats. This will allow you to engage and toss the foe once your base has been set . Solution: Pressing, chins, and rows.

Third, you must have good grip and arm strength. Grabbing cloth, arm or a throat to dissuade the penetration is a good way of warding off the attack. Solution: high rep DB rows, curls, towel/rope chins.

Fourth, you need to have a strong core to maintain balance during the struggle. Solution: Deadlifts, good mornings, back raises, hanging leg raises, sit-ups and the ab wheel.

Fifth, you need some footwork to shuffle and move quick to avoid anal assault. Solution: Jumping Rope

Finally, you need to be in some kind of decent shape - this is not a marathon fight (few are, no fights are 3 rounds like the UFC fighters engage in). I recommend short bursts of physical activity. Solution: Prowler and hill sprints.

In addition, Matt pointed out to me that while a smaller man may be more agile, a bigger, stronger man is always harder to contend with.

datboi 09-29-2012 11:45 AM

woah bet no ones ever raped you

5kgLifter 09-29-2012 05:11 PM

Do you actually box? You never mentioned that point and it's an important one because a skill can only be improved upon if practised, all the bench pressing and weight training in the world will be of no use if the person doesn't use the techniques regularly since most artforms (fighting and otherwise) come down to skill which results from practice of that skill.


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