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-   -   The War On Salt (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12294)

BendtheBar 01-24-2013 09:41 AM

The War On Salt
 
Posting for discussion:

It's Time to End the War on Salt: Scientific American

Quote:

This week a meta-analysis of seven studies involving a total of 6,250 subjects in the American Journal of Hypertension found no strong evidence that cutting salt intake reduces the risk for heart attacks, strokes or death in people with normal or high blood pressure. In May European researchers publishing in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that the less sodium that study subjects excreted in their urine—an excellent measure of prior consumption—the greater their risk was of dying from heart disease. These findings call into question the common wisdom that excess salt is bad for you, but the evidence linking salt to heart disease has always been tenuous.
Quote:

Over the long-term, low-salt diets, compared to normal diets, decreased systolic blood pressure (the top number in the blood pressure ratio) in healthy people by 1.1 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) by 0.6 mmHg. That is like going from 120/80 to 119/79.

5kgLifter 01-24-2013 11:34 AM

I have read articles where people have been told to excessively reduce their salt to really pathetically low levels and then been placed on water tablets only to end up in hospital with a heart condition caused by the lack of salt in their systems as a result of the ridiculous combo of meds and extreme dietary measures.

Balancing the potassium levels along with the sodium would be a better way forward, IMO.

lowcarbguy 01-25-2013 07:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 316308)

I am surprised that this how it changes. I figured eating a diet lower in sodium would make a huge difference.

jdmalm123 01-25-2013 07:47 PM

For years I never added (or worried about) salt.

If anything, when I am training hard, I need "extra" salt.

As with all foods, quality matters. Good sea salt is practically a superfood compared to typical NaCl table salt.

SCStrong 01-25-2013 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdmalm123 (Post 317097)
For years I never added (or worried about) salt.

If anything, when I am training hard, I need "extra" salt.

As with all foods, quality matters. Good sea salt is practically a superfood compared to typical NaCl table salt.

This-Me too:sm3:

sleepingdog 02-08-2013 06:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dove45 (Post 322242)
According to me, So much speedily reducing salt is not a good sign. For healthy body and to maintain good diet, it is necessary to use sea salt which should be pure as well..

Dove, I tend to disagree. Sodium intake doesn't HAVE to be from sea salt. I'm looking at the back of a knock-off gatorade right now, and it contains 110mg of sodium. If I use that to wash down 1 serving of beef jerky, I add another 600mg. And lets be honest, who eats ONE servering of beef jerky once a big bag opens? This is just me munching on a snack at my desk. What about a full meal? You might get a full gram of sodium from your food without adding salt to anything. Hence, no need to substitute sea salt.

I'm not saying that sea salt is not an excellent way to get your daily sodium, but it is far from necessary.

fenrisulfr 02-08-2013 10:24 AM

I am always told i am at prehypertension levels, and i dont add salt to anything. I am always caffeined up though.!

BendtheBar 05-14-2013 05:26 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/15/he....html?hp&_r=1&

Quote:

In a report that undercuts years of public health warnings, a prestigious group convened by the government says there is no good reason based on health outcomes for many Americans to drive their sodium consumption down to the very low levels recommended in national dietary guidelines.


Those levels, 1,500 milligrams of sodium a day, or a little more than half a teaspoon of salt, were supposed to prevent heart attacks and strokes in people at risk, including anyone older than 50, blacks and people with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease — a group that makes up more than half of the American population.


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