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-   -   When to switch exercises? (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2756)

sneezingstardust 04-03-2010 03:00 PM

When to switch exercises?
 
How often do you guys switch up your routine?

Assuming someone does 3 full-body routines per week, how beneficial and necessary is it to switch up the exercises being done?

Trevor Lane 04-03-2010 03:22 PM

I would say whenever you're bored with one.

BendtheBar 04-03-2010 04:34 PM

I generally keep the staples and find new and interesting ways to do them differently. I find it's not the exercises that bore me, it's the routine.

onetiredkris 04-03-2010 04:37 PM

If its a mental thing, by all means switch it up if that's what is needed to keep you motivated.

Other than that, I'm a believer in progression threw adaption. So I never switch up my movements.

big valsalva 04-03-2010 05:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by onetiredkris (Post 44600)
If its a mental thing, by all means switch it up if that's what is needed to keep you motivated.

Other than that, I'm a believer in progression threw adaption. So I never switch up my movements.

I agree here. An option that I found useful and interesting is to adopt a rotation of maybe two or three fullbody routines and do your workouts A-B-C, then repeat. Just make sure you're progressing each time you repeat a particular workout. For example, make sure A2 is better than A1. This is basic doggcrapp style philosophy. If you bomb out on a particular exercise two or three times in a row, throw it out for a while and put something else in its place.

glwanabe 04-03-2010 05:56 PM

My overall program remains pretty consistant as far as which moves I'm doing. Sets and reps change from time to time, as well as which moves get done in which order.

Progression is king is what I work by. I'm always looking to add weight to the bar. I'm never really bored with any of the movements that I do. Rather I may need a break from doing something due to accumulated fatique.

I'm in that phase right now with what I'm doing, and so I've deloaded to make a new run at higher weights. The one big change I put in was to really get old school with my squats , and get down deep in the hole. On the bottom!

Something that I've noticed over the last several months, as I've really dug into old school training. You don't need a lot of moves to build a great physique. Some of the really great bodies of the past built their bodies with very basic programs, but pushed hard on those few moves that they did.

Today, people get way to hung up on doing far to many isolation moves. They think a well equipped gym has to have tons of special machines. You really don't need all that much in terms of equipment. Just some basic stuff is all you need. however, you must work hard with what you have.

Keep it simple, get in and get out.
Have a goal, and work towards that end.
Push for progression each week.
Eat, sleep, and have a life outside the gym.

Bodybygamma 04-04-2010 02:34 AM

Whenever they stop working. I normally give myself a minimum of 1 month to 3 months and in between before I start switching around my main compound lifts.

For assistance I cycle them far more often based on goals and needs at the time.

Bodybygamma 04-04-2010 02:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by glwanabe (Post 44646)
My overall program remains pretty consistant as far as which moves I'm doing. Sets and reps change from time to time, as well as which moves get done in which order.

Progression is king is what I work by. I'm always looking to add weight to the bar. I'm never really bored with any of the movements that I do. Rather I may need a break from doing something due to accumulated fatique.

I'm in that phase right now with what I'm doing, and so I've deloaded to make a new run at higher weights. The one big change I put in was to really get old school with my squats , and get down deep in the hole. On the bottom!

Something that I've noticed over the last several months, as I've really dug into old school training. You don't need a lot of moves to build a great physique. Some of the really great bodies of the past built their bodies with very basic programs, but pushed hard on those few moves that they did.

Today, people get way to hung up on doing far to many isolation moves. They think a well equipped gym has to have tons of special machines. You really don't need all that much in terms of equipment. Just some basic stuff is all you need. however, you must work hard with what you have.

Keep it simple, get in and get out.
Have a goal, and work towards that end.
Push for progression each week.
Eat, sleep, and have a life outside the gym.

Agreed

sneezingstardust 04-04-2010 09:14 AM

Thanks for all the answers, guys! Helped a lot :)

I can never get tired of squats/deads/presses, etc. JW everyone elses thoughts.

big valsalva 04-04-2010 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sneezingstardust (Post 44792)
Thanks for all the answers, guys! Helped a lot :)

I can never get tired of squats/deads/presses, etc. JW everyone elses thoughts.

Then you shall never go wrong.


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