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Muscle Building and Bodybuilding Topics related to muscle building, bodybuilding, including training and fullbody workouts. If you are looking for great advice on gaining muscle this forum is for you.

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Old 03-04-2010, 01:18 PM   #41
glwanabe
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Originally Posted by BendtheBar View Post
Regarding psychological fatigue, I'm old school. When work needs to be done, I do it.

I teach my children that despite how they feel at any given moment, they need to do the right thing. This is being responsible. I might ask them how they feel about the work, but I never enable them to fail by letting them out of work because of emotional or psychological fatigue.

I think all of us have emotional and psychological fatigue to varying degrees each day. But I believe that the character of a man comes from doing what is right or hard or just no matter where he is at.

And when it comes to lifting iron, I believe those that "do" despite these fatigues are those that climb the mountain. If someone is in an emotionally/psychologically weak place, work still needs to get done. I think by stressing this reality, we set the proper standard.

I grew up around enablers. Everything was about "feeling". "It's OK Stevie, have a cookie."

I wish I had someone growing up that would have said, "Son, I understand where you are at. But a man is what a man does, and I will be most proud of you if shine in this tough moment."

I teach my children this, and live every day with this expectation placed upon myself. I fail sometimes, but when I triumph despite my situation, it is an amazing and uplifting feeling.

Last week when I deadlifted 525 for 4 reps with a shoulder and forearm strain, I felt most proud that I didn't quit. The lift PR was secondary.
Excellant post Steve. I agree with this, and I'm glad you wrote this because it shows that I did not properly share my though process completely.


A couple of weeks ago, when I was going to test my squat max we talked about the mental aspect of just getting under the bar with the weight.

You said'

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Originally Posted by BendtheBar View Post
Nice job GL. For me, adding heavier weight on the squat is almost all mental. It feels so much different than a bench or deadlift. I think it's good that you got under that weight so you could mentally cross the bridge.

Light Weight Baby!
I'm not the kind of person to give up on what needs to be done. I'm constantly pushing myself to get to the next level, or add another rep.

The mental aspect of my program really comes in on Fridays. You have already done 4 heavy movements that week, 6 if you count the calves that are being done on "off" days.

When you have finished your Fridays heavy work, your pretty tired. Knowing that your working at a smaller % of max to finish off those other 3 moves gives you some mental breathing room. Physically, they are just as hard to complete as the heavy work, if not more so. Your already tired, and have worked on moves that still tax your lighter work.

mentally, it's about knowing how much work you need to do that week, and being able to hit it as hard as possible, and still get it all done. I make a point of this in my log, when I talk about how I'm feeling at the end of the week. I need to be able to sustain this cycle for 16 weeks. I need to know that physically, my body can continue with the level of work I'm giving it, and not break down mid journey. Mentally, it is about the planning, and knowing that I can do the level of work that I've laid out for myself.

It happens almost every session that physically, I can't complete a rep. So I allow myself to take a breath, and then finish those reps. If I did not have the right attitude it would be very easy to just skip those assistance moves. That kind of attitude is not going to get me where I want to be. If I didn't have the mental toughness to see my goals through, I would not have gotten my first two workouts in this week. I could have just bagged it because I was not feeling good.

I don't want you to get the wrong idea about what I said in my first post, or for it to seem like I've contradicted myself with things we have talked about.
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Old 03-04-2010, 02:04 PM   #42
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I think the point being made is ultimately the same for all here. The thing about "psychology" is that it's a mind game. Nothing more or less, really.

Physically, You can lift what you can lift and you can push as hard as you can push. Push yourself too hard and you'll die, hurt yourself, or literally be unable to continue for a time. That's a literal thing.

But no one's mind is 100% (I'm betting) in sync with that. In our minds, we can all push significantly less than we actually can (be it in sheer strength or overall effort). Some are much closer than others, clearly. But we're all on the road of improvement in this regard.

Bringing our minds in sync with our bodies is the point. Not living up to ones physical potential is a mental thing.

However, allowing that we are only as strong mentally as we are, instead of expecting perfection in this regard both from ourselves and others, needs to be balanced against excuses and invalid justifications.
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