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-   -   Maintaining body weight (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11034)

IronManlet 09-05-2012 09:23 AM

Maintaining body weight
 
Does anyone have tips on how to maintain a certain body weight rather than gaining more size?

I'd imagine it would involve a stricter diet and lower training volume, but if anyone has done this or knows how I would appreciate any advice. I'm currently not interested in getting much bigger; maybe 5-10lbs more at the most.

themaster2981 09-05-2012 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IronManlet (Post 274010)
Does anyone have tips on how to maintain a certain body weight rather than gaining more size?

I'd imagine it would involve a stricter diet and lower training volume, but if anyone has done this or knows how I would appreciate any advice. I'm currently not interested in getting much bigger; maybe 5-10lbs more at the most.

I too want to cap my body weight, but on the contrary, I want to gain size at the same time. I am 5.10 and 205 lbs. I see people who are lighter (as low as 175 lbs) than me but have ripped muscles, unlike me. :(

Rich Knapp 09-05-2012 09:40 AM

This is a delicate ballance of your macro's added with cardio as needed.

The big one to remember in doing this is muscle weighs more than fat. So you need to:

Use mirror and tape mesure more than scale, but scale is important also in tracking your progress as long as you weight in right away after you pee when you wake up.

This will take out the daily intake vereable. Threw out the day every little thing will change your true weight.

If your macro's are out of balance, even if you hit your cals on point you won't accomplish your goal. Your body will rebel and go the other way and store fat.

bamazav 09-05-2012 09:59 AM

Not wanting or trying to fight, but I do need to offer one correction.

Muscle is denser than fat, thus taking up less space, but a pound of muscle and a pound of fat both weigh a pound.

Chillen 09-05-2012 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IronManlet (Post 274010)
Does anyone have tips on how to maintain a certain body weight rather than gaining more size?

I'd imagine it would involve a stricter diet and lower training volume, but if anyone has done this or knows how I would appreciate any advice. I'm currently not interested in getting much bigger; maybe 5-10lbs more at the most.

Its largely knowing what your your personal calorie needs are in conjunction with the type and amount of activity you do each day, which would include employment work, training, etc. Cardiovascular activity isn't required to maintain an average (but the same) weight per week.

Weight isn't going to stay exactly the same each day, but you can manipulate it within an approximate +/- 3 or so pounds--when you work at it long enough to know yourself and your specific numeric numbers. Also, you have to consider feces in the colon and urine in the bladder, as these contribute to weight variance at the time of the weighing. Maintaining a certain weight is possible, but you have to accept a "normal" small variance.

For example, lets say you calculate a MT-Line that includes all activity, but your carbohydrates are high (say around 200 plus) for your weight, this alone could have a major affect on your weight variance though your at calorie maintenance.

The bottom line is determining your calorie maintenance according to your activities, and then manipulating the macros, and adjusting these when getting bodily feedback if the variances are to high for your liking. I do this all the time to maintain by specific body weight on an average.

If I want to binge, I prepare for it a week in advance, by keeping calories at MT-Line, reducing carbohydrates which will eventually reduce glucose stores. My body weight drops (water retention is lower), but at the end of the week (or so), my body is prepped to absorb A LOT of carbohydrates without (TISSUE GAIN). The next day, (post eating passed MT-Line and a lot of carbohydrates), I am usually leaner than the day before, with weight gradually rising back to normal as I eat more traditional normal carbohydrates. During this time I usually space out a glucose depletion workouts during the week, and then change the routine the following week to something else.


Any more information let me know.


Don

5kgLifter 09-05-2012 12:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by themaster2981 (Post 274011)
I too want to cap my body weight, but on the contrary, I want to gain size at the same time. I am 5.10 and 205 lbs. I see people who are lighter (as low as 175 lbs) than me but have ripped muscles, unlike me. :(

Isn't your goal powerlifting? If so, ripped muscles are the last thing you should be focussing on anyway ;)

Rich Knapp 09-05-2012 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bamazav (Post 274036)
Not wanting or trying to fight, but I do need to offer one correction.

Muscle is denser than fat, thus taking up less space, but a pound of muscle and a pound of fat both weigh a pound.

Thats were the tape measure comes in. I'm NOT saying a pound of feathers weight less than a pound of stones, just the same mass of fat weights less than the same mass of muscle. ;)

5kgLifter 09-05-2012 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bamazav (Post 274036)
Not wanting or trying to fight, but I do need to offer one correction.

Muscle is denser than fat, thus taking up less space, but a pound of muscle and a pound of fat both weigh a pound.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rich Knapp (Post 274083)
Thats were the tape measure comes in. I'm NOT saying a pound of feathers weight less than a pound of stones, just the same mass of fat weights less than the same mass of muscle. ;)

Yep :rockon: This is exactly how I ended up looking like I was losing weight whilst actually gaining weight with lean mass and dropping some bodyfat (not much of the latter, didn't have much to drop)...I got slimmer and heavier at the same time.

Rich Knapp 09-05-2012 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 5kgLifter (Post 274086)
Yep :rockon: This is exactly how I ended up looking like I was losing weight whilst actually gaining weight with lean mass and dropping some bodyfat (not much of the latter, didn't have much to drop)...I got slimmer and heavier at the same time.

Exactly. People will gain weight when dieting and working out and think there diet is all wrong not realizing they are loosing inches. Meaning they are dropping fat and gaining healthy and more muscle.

bamazav 09-05-2012 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Freak on Wheels
Thats were the tape measure comes in. I'm NOT saying a pound of feathers weight less than a pound of stones, just the same mass of fat weights less than the same mass of muscle. ;)

Agreed. we are on the same page.
Quote:

Originally Posted by 5kgLifter (Post 274086)
Yep :rockon: This is exactly how I ended up looking like I was losing weight whilst actually gaining weight with lean mass and dropping some bodyfat (not much of the latter, didn't have much to drop)...I got slimmer and heavier at the same time.

I would rather have the muscle density than the fat bloat! I will gladly trade muscle weight for fat any day of the week.


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