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-   -   Low Carb Diet Documentary (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5704)

BendtheBar 03-25-2011 10:16 AM

Low Carb Diet Documentary
 





BendtheBar 03-25-2011 11:05 AM

Video #2 is win.

10x improvement in cholesterol levels in 6 months eating high fat, versus low calorie, low fat diets.

bamazav 03-25-2011 12:13 PM

Good videos, nice lunch time watching. Though, I could have done with out chunky in the shower.

Interesting example of the last study cited. The largest person in my Fit for the King program came to me in January with her weekly food log. Low fat, High carb, almost no protein. I had her increase protein to 1g/lb bw. Since January 14, 2011 she is now down about 32 lbs and still shrinking.

BendtheBar 03-25-2011 01:11 PM

It raises interesting questions...as in, which is most important: protein or fat, or maybe both. Protein takes the upper hand in this battle, but having lived high protein for 2+ decades, I certainly know that in concert with carbs it's not a winning formula for weight loss.

bamazav 03-25-2011 01:53 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I would like to see a study about the types of carbs. What we have seen in the last century is an increase in production and consumption of processed simple carbs, loaf breads, cereals, instant this or that. At the same time we have seen an increase in obesity.

I am also praying over and about the foods listed in the Bible. Would God tell his creation to eat something that would kill them? A whole nother discussion. Anyway, while there are carbs on the list, NONE, would have been highly processed, but would have been stone ground mostly by hand. This would retain almost all of the fiber and nutrients. But, aside from the few grains listed, Barley, Wheat, Millet, Spelt and a few Legumes, Lentils primarily, and a few of the fruits, the overall food listing is fairly low carb.

We should also remember that until relatively recently, most grain foods were used as minor sides, not as main dishes. Even our pasta favorites were to be side dishes of the meat and veggies. The western diet began using grains as a cheap source of food and thrust them to the forefront. (again, a whole nother discussion)

rippednmichigan 03-25-2011 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 125086)
It raises interesting questions...as in, which is most important: protein or fat, or maybe both. Protein takes the upper hand in this battle, but having lived high protein for 2+ decades, I certainly know that in concert with carbs it's not a winning formula for weight loss.

^This statement holds so true for me.

bamazav 03-26-2011 08:58 AM

If you are eating your leafy greens and other low carb fiber laden veggies, I do not see how the high protein formula can be wrong in the long run. It is interesting that the increase in diagnoses of many of the digestive track diseases and cancers correlates with the advent of the carb based diet.

5kgLifter 03-26-2011 09:22 AM

Though it's not entirely along the same lines of "Low carb", if any of you are able to get hold of a copy of The China Study by Campbell and Campbell, it raises some interesting points about carbohydrate high/low diets and the sort of carbohydrate consumed, amongst other things.

I haven't read much of the book yet, but it's very good reading considering we all want the best from the diet. Certainly a book worth having on your shelf.



Concerning the protein/fat (carb) question, I feel it's really a case of a decent balance of all food groups...the problem with the carbs is most of the ones we eat are highly processed and I really think that's where the big problems are arising. Wheat is used more than spelt, whereas spelt is the oldest grain source known (I believe) but wheat was derived from it, modified basically, in order to grow in other climates and it's intriguing to find out that splet is tolerated a lot better than the wheat we now eat.

bamazav 03-26-2011 10:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 5kgLifter (Post 125192)
Though it's not entirely along the same lines of "Low carb", if any of you are able to get hold of a copy of The China Study by Campbell and Campbell, it raises some interesting points about carbohydrate high/low diets and the sort of carbohydrate consumed, amongst other things.

I haven't read much of the book yet, but it's very good reading considering we all want the best from the diet. Certainly a book worth having on your shelf.



Concerning the protein/fat (carb) question, I feel it's really a case of a decent balance of all food groups...the problem with the carbs is most of the ones we eat are highly processed and I really think that's where the big problems are arising. Wheat is used more than spelt, whereas spelt is the oldest grain source known (I believe) but wheat was derived from it, modified basically, in order to grow in other climates and it's intriguing to find out that splet is tolerated a lot better than the wheat we now eat.

Thanks for the referral Babs. Interesting points about spelt (hope I spelt that right :D).

Sentences bolded is a great points. Some people mistakenly believe that low carb means no carbs. The view, even among many low carbers, is that all carbs are bad. That is just not true. The Paleo diet, for example, includes carbs, just natural and primarily complex carbs. The avoidance should be of the processed and simple carbs which offer little to no nutritional value.

BendtheBar 03-26-2011 07:57 PM

Whenever I check out a new book in the fitness/diet realm, I like to read the negative reviews as well as the positive. This usually gives me a nice balance of ideas, and allows me to better process the content of the book.

The China Study's negative reviews were were interesting reading, for anyone who takes time to explore both sides of the argument.


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