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BendtheBar 10-16-2011 11:16 PM

Age and fitness
 
Cheating Father Time: 50-year-old can be every bit as fit as someone 30 years younger, but exercise is key

Cheating Father Time: 50-Year-Old Can Be Every Bit as Fit as Someone 30 Years Younger, but Exercise Is Key

Quote:

Who is likely to be fitter: a lazy 20-year-old or an active 50-year-old? New research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine provides statistical evidence that the 50-year-old can be every bit as fit as someone 30 years younger. But exercise -- how much, and how intense -- is the key, say K.G. Jebsen Center researchers.

Middle-aged exercise buffs who might be discouraged by the effects of aging on their overall fitness can take heart in research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine. Activity is far more important than age in determining fitness levels -- and an active 50-year-old can be every bit as fit as a sedentary 20-year-old, says Ulrik Wisloff, Jebsen Center director and principle investigator of the study.

The study shows that by increasing the intensity of your exercise, you can beat back the risk of metabolic syndrome, the troublesome set of risk factors that can predispose people to type 2 diabetes, stroke and cardiovascular problems.

"Physical condition is the most important factor in describing an individual's overall health, almost like a report card," says Stian Thoresen Aspenes, who was recently awarded his PhD by NTNU for his research conducted at the K.G. Jebsen Center.

5kgLifter 10-17-2011 06:04 AM

Looking around there are a lot of fitter older people than there appear to be younger fit people, these days. It may be because the day of being considered the granny/gramps that sits in a chair reading or crocheting is long gone and more people, even into their 80s and beyond, are getting active and enjoying it.

LtL 10-17-2011 06:17 AM

Now that my Dad has retired he has found it way easier to make time for exercise and is in much better shape than when he was working. Maybe that contributes....

LtL

Chillen 10-17-2011 07:42 AM

I have two sons, age 23 and 26. Neither train regularly (though they will train with me once in a while, if I get their young asses up, because I train more often in the mornings before work). I am stronger in every compound lift then either of them, including iso's. The only exercise I am not stronger, is the back squat. Though they are bigger, they are weaker in the weight room.

My youngest son, Quentin, is 230 pounds. My oldest son, Dustin, is 245 pounds. And, both are about 6ft 4in. They are monsters in comparison to their old man. They can not come close to benching their weight. At about 168, I do it for reps. If I did not train regularly in my middle 40's leading into age 50, I wouldn't even come close (say in comparison) to what my son's starting weight would be, if they began weight training regularly.

I owe a debt of gratitude to the iron for this.

What I do know, is that if they trained regularly, they would surpass there old man much more quickly, and then become stronger (in comparison) due to the age differences, being that they are in their prime.

There is a lesson here to learn.

Though I believe, physical "appearance" is NOT "necessarily" an indicator of one's health, at 50 I look far better then persons 30 years younger (and I just say this as it relates to the topic).

I owe a debt of gratitude to the iron for this. It has shown and proven its worth to me. And, along the way, I show my son's (as they grow older too), what they can achieve:

If they just get under the bar.

No amount of money can purchase this, because to me, its priceless.

Kuytrider 10-17-2011 07:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chillen (Post 181107)
I have two sons, age 23 and 26. Neither train regularly (though they will train with me once in a while, if I get their young asses up, because I train more often in the mornings before work). I am stronger in every compound lift then either of them, including iso's. The only exercise I am not stronger, is the back squat. Though they are bigger, they are weaker in the weight room.

My youngest son, Quentin, is 230 pounds. My oldest son, Dustin, is 245 pounds. And, both are about 6ft 4in. They are monsters in comparison to their old man. They can not come close to benching their weight. At about 168, I do it for reps. If I did not train regularly in my middle 40's leading into age 50, I wouldn't even come close (say in comparison) to what my son's starting weight would be, if they began weight training regularly.

I owe a debt of gratitude to the iron for this.

What I do know, is that if they trained regularly, they would surpass there old man much more quickly, and then become stronger (in comparison) due to the age differences, being that they are in their prime.

There is a lesson here to learn.

Though I believe, physical "appearance" is NOT "necessarily" an indicator of one's health, at 50 I look far better then persons 30 years younger (and I just say this as it relates to the topic).

I owe a debt of gratitude to the iron for this. It has shown and proven its worth to me. And, along the way, I show my son's (as they grow older too), what they can achieve:

If they just get under the bar.

No amount of money can purchase this, because to me, its priceless.

I stupidly believed as I am approaching 30 in a few months that my opportunity to make real strength gains were gone. Thanks to people like you and Steve, I realize I have plenty of time so long as I am making the effort in the here and now. You're in enviable shape for someone of ANY age. :mh:

Ryano 10-17-2011 08:51 AM

I'm 56 and I expect a PR at every bench meet I go to. I don't always get there, but it still happens occasionally. Getting older, you just have to take a day off occasionally to let some of the nagging little things heal. My normal workout routine is 4 days/wk. Am I fit???? I can't run a marathon, but I can walk as far as I want without getting winded and I can bench a house if need be.

Chillen 10-17-2011 09:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kuytrider (Post 181110)
I stupidly believed as I am approaching 30 in a few months that my opportunity to make real strength gains were gone. Thanks to people like you and Steve, I realize I have plenty of time so long as I am making the effort in the here and now. You're in enviable shape for someone of ANY age. :mh:


You are still your prime, dude! Thank you for your kind words, young man! :)

Nearly every day, I see persons at or near my age, that have large bellies (males), and grunt in pain to just pick up an item on the floor they may have dropped, waddle around like a duck and barely able to support their personal weight as they walk.

I was in deed sort of like this once. I was a fat ass near 200 pounds (and at 5'7'') that is carrying a lot of weight (with no weight training experience behind me), I was just a lard ass, period. And, flat weak sauce.

For example, when I first started, my bench press was about 80 to 90 pounds, about 44 years of age. Now, add "nearly" 200 lbs to this starting weight, in about 5 years. Muscle has come slow, but it has come. My body likes to pile on the fat more than it does muscle, so I have to be careful with the diet during a bulk, but it still........."wants" or is "willing" to add muscle and strength--as long as I "give it a progressive reason to".

Weight training leaves no doubt, in its postive impact on the aging process.

I dont even want to think, where I would be without my Iron-buddy.

We are buds......forever. Why, because I do have some control over this. I do not have control over the aging process. However, what I have control over----"effects" what I do not have control over. And, this simply makes good sense.

I may add, in a short sprint (up hill, since I train this as well), I can out do my kids. The get me on the longer sprints, but I don't train this......HM...I may want to suprise their young asses...by BUSTEN THEIR ASSES!.....he, he :)

BendtheBar 10-17-2011 09:06 AM

Training with an eye on longevity isn't a popular topic in the lifting realm. I firmly believe if you listen to your body and work on good form every day, the sky is the limit.

I am 44 and I can't begin to explain to you just how good I feel under the iron.

Ryano 10-17-2011 09:10 AM

Being big and strong, like all powerlifters try to be, isn't that healthy. How many 250lb + men do you see in their 70's walking around? Not many if any. The bigger you are, the harder your heart has to work, even if that size is mostly due to muscle mass. I would rather be big and strong than just big. LOL

BendtheBar 10-17-2011 09:13 AM

Heck most 44 years olds have some sort of back problem. I am pulling over 600 pounds off the ground and feeling great.

So the next time someone says deadlifting is bad for the back, remind then the alternative (the couch) is 50 times worse.


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