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-   -   Scooby on Fat Acceptance (http://www.muscleandbrawn.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14065)

BendtheBar 06-17-2013 10:49 AM

Scooby on Fat Acceptance
 

BendtheBar 06-17-2013 11:03 AM

Just posting this to counter Scoobs.

My mother worked in a laundry room for 30 years. She was very physically active during the day, generally on her feet, lifting, loading and walking for 8 to 12 hours per day in a very hot environment.

I never saw her binge eat. In fact, when she did eat any form of junk, it was with a high degree of moderation. I also never witnessed my mother overeat. She always maintained a high degree of self-control.

None of her eating habits had to do with health or some drive to stick to some sort of eating plan. She just kind of ate normally. Farm raised, lived with common sense.

Now despite this high degree of physical activity and a 45 year adherence to a reasonable eating approach, my mother's weight fluctuated between 210 to 250. She did try some diets over the years, but when she went back to eating normally the weight came back on.

My reason for posting this is simple...sometimes the equation is far more complex than just eating reasonably and staying active. The only known change she experienced during the course of her life was a switch from fresh, whole, farm foods at the age of 22 to a more processed food-centric lifestyle.

She began eating low-fat this, and low-sugar that because she believed it was the healthy choice. Can I say for certain this variable was at the root of her weight issues? Of course not.

Again my main point is simple...the equation isn't always as simplistic as we'd like to make it out to be.

Bill 06-17-2013 11:49 AM

scooby looks really funny.

does mr scooby talk about the amounts of drugs he pumps into his system? (not that i care about drugs. figure since he posts all these videos on how to get big/ripped, a fair bit of disclosure is needed)

SaxonViolence 06-17-2013 12:41 PM

I've said it before:

Take out that 1/3 of 1% of people who truly have Iron Will...

With the exception of some temporary aberrations called "Diets";

Everyone Eats to Satiation.

It is almost an Impossibility to Voluntarily restrict one's self to Less Than Satiation for very long.

It is simply not the way Humans are set up to function.

So the question becomes:

"Why Does The Universal Strategy (eating to satiation) Work Well for Some, While Letting Others Down So Drastically?"

Sometimes Low Carbohydrate Diets Help.

Sometimes Adopting Low Fat Diets Help.

Sometimes adding Some Aerobics Helps.

Sometimes adding Muscle Mass Helps.

Sometimes making up some Nutrient Deficiency Helps.


But the Stark Fact is that IF Eating to Satiation Makes You Fat;

Statistically, you will probably spend most of your life overweight.

In 1983 I was 26 years old, weighing about 220—well, between 208 and 220.

I was unemployed and had all day to devote to running—and I had the Dumb-Bass Idea that I wanted to go in the Army and be a Paratrooper.

I worked up to running 12 miles per day while wearing a 15 Pound weight belt. And I ran to the end of my course and then walked 12 miles back.

We were poor and rations were tight.

I had also heard that the Military starved one in Basic Training.

I had discovered that something weird happened to my endurance when I dropped below 208.

I ate toast covered with a quarter inch of margarine, topped with a quarter inch of Sugar to try to keep my weight above 208 when it was dropping.

I went in with the idea that it was necessary to load up on grub whenever possible, to stay away from that dreaded 208 and below.

Loose fitting pants; no scale available; much less Cardio than I was used to; a commitment to "Filling Up" and too much stress to re-evaluate...

In all Sincerity—Basic Training had me seriously considering Suicide as a way out...

I gained about 45 pounds of fat in Basic Training!

When they finally discharged me for Overweight ten and a half months after I went in, I weighed 280 and have never been in control of my weight since.

IF it takes someone running and walking 3.5 to 4.5 hours daily to keep the Fat monster at bay—when you re-enter the job market, you're gonna stumble—and each time, it is harder to come back.

I don't have all the answers. I really don't have any answer.

I do know that some Schmucksperts talk out their Ass-Hole.



Saxon Violence

5kgLifter 06-17-2013 02:07 PM

I haven't watched it, I figure, from what people have written, that he's discussing the simplistic food in to energy output ratio...nothing is ever that simple.

Take 2 scenarios:

1) A person on higher/medium doses of medically prescribed steroids, they balloon up with little food (and little means next to none, quite literally); I once saw a guy, that had a go at hubby...both on the steroids, the difference being, the guy was able to get off the steroids, after his operation, and his weight returned to normal (slim), some don't have that luxury and have an uphill battle that they can at best hold their own against but can never win.

2) A female that had a pituitary gland issue, nobody knew for over 25 years, she ballooned up, even though she had been active, enjoyed tennis and other sports on a frequent basis...she ended up with 25 years of lost time, damaged joints due to the weight gain, insults, etc, etc...they did the op (when they eventually realised what was wrong and stopped blaming her diet) and the weight dropped...she still lost those 25 years though.


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