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NTO 01-18-2011 09:00 AM

Light weight workouts
 
The claim is lifting lighter weights more times can produce just as much muscle as lifting heavier for fewer reps. Make sense to anyone?

Best Way to Build Muscle - Less Weight More Reps - Health Tip - RealAge

BendtheBar 01-18-2011 09:34 AM

I'm sure it can work as long as progression of weight is involved.

A workout that uses light weight and doesn't involve progression of intensity on some level will not yield any noticeable results.

This article took a viable approach...using a higher rep scheme (maybe 12-20)...and skewed it in a completely ineffective manner.

Nearly anything will trigger beginner gains. For rank beginners, as in this study, a volume of reps is probably more effective. It's a great stimulus, and most likely a greater overall training volume.

24 reps x 20 pounds = 480 pounds of volume

5 reps x 50 pounds = 250 pounds of volume

An untrained beginner will most likely get beat up from a greater volume, but this is a near sighted approach. After this wears off, in about 2 weeks, progression takes over and this house of cards crumbles.

Light weight will serve you well for several weeks. And then it all comes back to progression, regardless of your rep range.

glwanabe 01-18-2011 09:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 108093)
I'm sure it can work as long as progression of weight is involved.

A workout that uses light weight and doesn't involve progression of intensity on some level will not yield any noticeable results.

This article took a viable approach...using a higher rep scheme (maybe 12-20)...and skewed it in a completely ineffective manner.

Nearly anything will trigger beginner gains. For rank beginners, as in this study, a volume of reps is probably more effective. It's a great stimulus, and most likely a greater overall training volume.

24 reps x 20 pounds = 480 pounds of volume

5 reps x 50 pounds = 250 pounds of volume

An untrained beginner will most likely get beat up from a greater volume, but this is a near sighted approach. After this wears off, in about 2 weeks, progression takes over and this house of cards crumbles.

Light weight will serve you well for several weeks. And then it all comes back to progression, regardless of your rep range.


This is the EXACT scenario I am having my Wife begin her new training program on. Light weight, higher reps, bumping up volume over a few weeks until this method has run it's course.

I'm doing this with her for a few reasons. She is today, and will continue to be just a little sore the day after, but nothing that will scare her off from continuing. She is developing much needed conditioning for the heavier work that is coming, that she can't see yet.

I have her doing a version of the Reeves classic BTW. I had her at 2x8-10 reps yesterday for a few key moves, plus some ab work. She enjoyed it, and just feels the work today.

I have told her that progression will come, and have been beating the phrase,

"Progression is KING!" into her head.

I really want her to keep at this program. She could do amazing things if she could mentall commit to the work, and make it a part of her daily routine.

BendtheBar 01-18-2011 10:01 AM

I may have exaggerated the 2 weeks part :)

I think you bring up an important point...DOMs. Far too many beginners beat the snot out of their bodies to the point where they can't move the next day. This is neither needed or necessary.

A rank beginner needs to work on form, so more repetition is beneficial for several. They also need to work on stabilizer muscle strength, so I can see more reps with a lighter weight being helpful as they build stabilizer momentum. Heavy, taxing weight out the gate can also create debilitating DOMs, which can also be a mental deterrent.

It makes sense to me to start slow with higher than normal reps, but once form is ok, confidence is there, and a lifter has improved stabilizers to a minor degree, it's time to start adding some reps and weight. This doesn't have to be ultra rapid. Slow and steady leads to big progress.

glwanabe 01-18-2011 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 108095)
I may have exaggerated the 2 weeks part :)I think you bring up an important point...DOMs. Far too many beginners beat the snot out of their bodies to the point where they can't move the next day. This is neither needed or necessary.

A rank beginner needs to work on form, so more repetition is beneficial for several. They also need to work on stabilizer muscle strength, so I can see more reps with a lighter weight being helpful as they build stabilizer momentum. Heavy, taxing weight out the gate can also create debilitating DOMs, which can also be a mental deterrent.

It makes sense to me to start slow with higher than normal reps, but once form is ok, confidence is there, and a lifter has improved stabilizers to a minor degree, it's time to start adding some reps and weight. This doesn't have to be ultra rapid. Slow and steady leads to big progress.

Maybe, but a solid month of good ground work should be enough for most people to start adding weight, and actually train. Even if the weight is still a little light, focusing on progression is the key, and a year of doing this will have them WAY down the road from where they started from.

NTO 01-18-2011 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BendtheBar (Post 108095)
It makes sense to me to start slow with higher than normal reps, but once form is ok, confidence is there, and a lifter has improved stabilizers to a minor degree, it's time to start adding some reps and weight. This doesn't have to be ultra rapid. Slow and steady leads to big progress.

I think this comment is right on spot! I'm a beginner myself and instantly found myself getting ( slightly ) injured trying to move heavy-ass weights out of the gate. When I got past my own ego and dropped the weights down, my form and progress increased and my injuries decreased. Ego can be a b*tch sometimes. lol


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