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Old 12-17-2010, 12:45 PM   #1
glwanabe
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Default Your Weightlifting Resume.

Quote:
The MAB no bull rule.

If you make a outrageous claim, back it up with pictures or video. If you do not, you will not be allowed to give training advice on this forum.

What constitutes an outrageous claim? ...

"I have 20 inch arms at 5% bodyfat."

"I can deadlift 650 pounds, so follow my deadlift program."

"That routine sucks, you should follow mine because it has given me amazing results."

Bottom line. This isn't a hack, e-stats forum. I want this to be a forum where no one hides behind an avatar. Try to be open and honest about where you are at. Also, try to not make blanket statements about what does, and doesn't suck.

I want you to contribute your experiences. I DO NOT want you to heap up BS without backing it with evidence.

This is a rule we have here, and I personally like it. I like honest communication, and knowing what background a person has to speak on a subject they are talking about.

This is very important, I dont want anyone to think that I'm saying people should not contribute. Everyone is free to contribute to any topic.


What is your lifting resume?

In what areas do you feel that you are strongest, in terms of experience to add to the conversation?

In what areas do you generally not speak on?

How did you come to your particular methodology, or is it still being defined?

What do you see as the biggest problem with barbell sports today?

What are some of the biggest mistakes you're made along the way?

When it comes to advice, how do you pick and choose who you listen too?


Feel free to ask more questions. These are just a few that came to mind.
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Old 12-17-2010, 12:45 PM   #2
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My Resume

I started lifting at the age of 15 with a dept. store plastic concrete weight set, and a bench. I was a very skinny kid with no real strength, and I did not like that.

Some show was on talking about movies that had caused a stir that year, and Pumping Iron was one of those shows. The clip they showed was of Arnold doing concentration curls, and flexing his arms. I WANTED TO LOOK LIKE THAT! That was it, I would do that thing, and be a bodybuilder.

I turned 16 and I already had job. I was making 3.50hr at 16yrs of age. This was in 1978, and that was good money. I bought Arnolds, Education of a Bodybuilder, and the book Pumping Iron. The bookstore was having a book signing with Arnold about three weeks later. I was not going to miss the chance to meet him. Alas, he left and hour early due to low turnout. I was sad.

I lived in those books, and worked hard, but not smart. I progressed, but would have done better with a better plan of attack.

High School my Senior year, and that plan would be implemented. i had weightlifting class, that focused on basics, and progression. I made solid gains that year, and left high school weighing 135lbs, benching 220, squatting 285, deadlifting 385, clean and press 185, and a few other lifts that I forget.

I lifted on and off for the next 8 years, but made no real progress. Insert having a life right here, and other obligations. Thats a different story

At 28 I joined the Army, and got focused again. I started lifting seriously again, and worked my way back. I was having fun again, but still didn't know how much I didn't know. Then another layoff happened, 8 years worth.

That brings me almost all the way up to where I found MAB. I had started studying lifting, and putting things together. I found hte area's I wanted to focus on in my own lifting, and what really interested me. It had nothing to do with modern bodybuilding. The sport I had loved at 15 was gone. I went in search of what I wanted, and due to the internet I was able to find enough to scrape together a plan of attack of where I wanted my comfort zone to be.


In what areas do you feel that you are strongest, in terms of experience to add to the conversation?

Classic Bodybuilding, Fullbody methodology, mistakes I've made.


In what areas do you generally not speak on?

Diet, Drugs, Supplements, Power lifting specific methodology


How did you come to your particular methodology, or is it still being defined?

I find fullbody work challenging, and fun. I prefer the classic physique to the modern distortion. I'm constantly trying to learn more. There is still a huge amount of information about classic style work, that I have not even touched.




What do you see as the biggest problem with barbell sports today?

Drugs, supplements, and unreal expectations. There is a lot of BS being pushed on the public that is a real black eye to the sport.



What are some of the biggest mistakes you're made along the way?

Not having a well thought out plan to work.


When it comes to advice, how do you pick and choose who you listen too?

Basically it comes down to this. I like to hear from people who keep it simple. It just does not need to be complicated.

Last edited by glwanabe; 12-17-2010 at 01:55 PM.
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Old 12-17-2010, 12:58 PM   #3
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What is your lifting resume?
One year and 2 months today. Never done any shows or anything like that.

In what areas do you feel that you are strongest, in terms of experience to add to the conversation?
I do not think I am strong in any one area because I haven't been lifting long enough to be strong in any area. So I will say, I am strong in bustin ass every day

In what areas do you generally not speak on?
Diet

How did you come to your particular methodology, or is it still being defined?
Reading forums on MAB. Work hard and listen to your body

What do you see as the biggest problem with barbell sports today?
Unrealistic goals. Fear of real hard work.

What are some of the biggest mistakes you're made along the way?
Pushing myself when I wasn't comfortable with the weight and I ended up tearing my meniscus.

When it comes to advice, how do you pick and choose who you listen too?
I listen to the main group here on MAB because they always have reasons and proof to back it up.
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Old 12-17-2010, 01:08 PM   #4
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What is your lifting resume?
1 year of being serious, 10 of on & off retardedness.
In what areas do you feel that you are strongest, in terms of experience to add to the conversation?
I know alot about what not to do

In what areas do you generally not speak on?
Supplementation

How did you come to your particular methodology, or is it still being defined?
Kaz did it.

What do you see as the biggest problem with barbell sports today?
Assistance suits and any technology that takes personal strength out of strength athletics.

What are some of the biggest mistakes you're made along the way?
Lack of consistency and fear of moving serious weight

When it comes to advice, how do you pick and choose who you listen too?
Their personal record. If a lab coat talks about lifting, they know nothing useful. If they're a world class athlete who also has a PHD/MD they know their shit.

Last edited by Trevor Lane; 12-17-2010 at 01:26 PM.
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Old 12-17-2010, 01:16 PM   #5
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What is your lifting resume?

I lifted as a teen with my plastic and concrete weight set. I was an exercise fanatic but never got any results. I was paper thin, small-boned and had a lightning fast metabolism.

In 1986 I entered college and had access to a small gym packed with barbells and dumbbells...and a squat rack. I had a college English professor help me with training. He was a bodybuilder, and my mentor.

With access to a nice gym and all the food I could eat, I gained like a fool. Within 4 months my mentor was pulling me aside asking me if I was taking steroids.

I was using all the cores...squats, dips, bench, power cleans, overhead presses, etc.

By 1988 I was a freak to my family. My legs were so big that my sister was begging me to stop lifting. Guys at the gym would ask me my secrets, and women were finally paying attention to me.

This was a good place for me to be at mentally, as I was a depressed teen with a violent alcoholic father.

In 1997 I reached my peak. I relied upon 90% heavy compound lifts and simple progression, and was benching 430, overhead pressing 120 pound dumbbells for reps, etc. My wife would tell em every day...I can't believe how big your arms are.

In 2008 I started Muscle and Brawn. I wanted to provide a respectful site without all the e-stats and brah bashing at other lifting forums.

In 2009 I became an industry writer, as well as a feature writer for the largest female bodybuilding site on the web, and the largest natural site on the web. I currently write for Natural Muscle Mag, and have interviewed everyone from Frank Zane to Clarence Bass to Jon Jon Park to Casey Butt to Layne Norton to Lisa Aukland to Mah Ann Mendoza to (thanks Doc) Ronnie Coleman. I also have had contact with Mark Dugdale, who has given me an open invitation to eat with him if I'm in the area.

I love lifting. It makes me feel like a child. It's pure pleasure for me. I would train 3 hours a day if I could. I'm not into the scientific end much. Lifting for me is intimate. Just me and the weight. I don't like to think when I'm with the iron.

My best lifts to date (all documented on Youtube) are:

--Squat: 500x1 and 440 x 5
--Bench: 430 x 1 (in 1997)
--Deadlift: 565 x 1 (had more in the tank but failed at 600), and 525 x 4

By the way, I have never had a major weight lifting injury.

In what areas do you feel that you are strongest, in terms of experience to add to the conversation?

I am more of a pure powerbuilder. I love training for muscle and strength at the same time.

I love simple programs and basic lifts. I also work hard on form, and have always used good form when lifting.

I am not an OCD lifter. I do not believe recreational lifters who want strength and muscle need to be incredibly anal about every last detail. They need a smart eating approach for sure, but do not need PCF ratios, etc.

My experience is hard work using non-OCD methods.

I also have a passion for old school lifting, pre-steroid era.

In what areas do you generally not speak on?

Cutting diets. I have a few resources, but I have never been abs obsessed and that area of lifting I really don't care much about. I have studied it, and I have been lean with abs twice, but it is boring to me.

How did you come to your particular methodology, or is it still being defined?

Early on I just wanted to not be an idiot in the gym. The first time I benched I failed on my 4th rep with 95 pounds. I was so embarrassed that I just started pushing for more reps and weight on every set. This worked wonders.

What do you see as the biggest problem with barbell sports today?

1) People overcomplicating things. There is supply and demand working here. When the masses DON'T get results, the magazines feed them "blurbs" to lure them into crazy, and unneeded complexity with the hope that things will change. "Selling" hard work isn't easy. So they sell complexity which makes a reader say...ahh, that's why I'm not making gains! If I only do my lat pulldowns in supersets with limited rest blah, blah blah.

The magazines don't tell them to do 2 simple things...eat more and lift more.

2) Steroids. Not a rant against steroids, but AAS users and naturals need to understand the differences. Naturals can't make gains forever. All this muscle confusion stuff is great when you're on AAS and need to re-ignite your receptors, but that doesn't fly with natural trainees. Naturals benefit more from a simple and hard linear approach using compound lifts.

What are some of the biggest mistakes you're made along the way?

Buying into the nonsense that as a natural gains will keep coming. Also performing high volume after I was nearly at my max potential. There is no point. Work hard, max out, train smarter.

I see some maxed naturals training 2-3 hours a day thinking they will add another 5 pounds in the next year. Yet they refuse to admit that they haven't gained a pound in the last 5 years.


When it comes to advice, how do you pick and choose who you listen too?


I listen to naturals who lift heavy rocks. I listen to those that land on the side of simplicity. I listen to people who AREN'T proclaiming a need for complexity and confusion.

I listen to guys who just shut the heck up and do the work, and get results.
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Last edited by BendtheBar; 12-17-2010 at 01:44 PM.
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:11 PM   #6
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:54 PM   #7
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What is your lifting resume?
1 show I did, I lissoned to others, and I didn't place in the top 3 in my class. Here is how I did at ALL the rest of my shows.

May 22, 2010: NANBF 2010 NANBF Mr./Ms. Natural MN Championships. - Placing: 1


Apr 24, 2010: INBF 2010 INBF WI State Bodybuilding Championships - Placing: 1

Apr 10, 2010: INBF 2010 INBF US Central Bodybuilding and Fitness Cham - Placing: 1

Nov 10, 2004: INBF 2004 INBF Great Lakes Championship, Pro-Qualifier - Placing: 2

Nov 10, 2003: INBF 2003 INBF Great Lakes Pro-Qualifier - Placing: 3

Nov 10, 2002: INBF 2002 INBF Great Lakes Championship, Pro-qualifier - Placing: 2

Apr 14, 2002: INBF 2002 INBF WI State Championships. - Placing: 1

Nov 10, 2001: INBF 2001 INBF Great Lakes Championship, Pro-qualifier - Placing: 2

Nov 10, 2001: INBF 2001 INBF WI State Championships - Placing: 2

Nov 10, 2000: INBF 2000 INBF Great Lakes Pro-Qualifier - Placing: 3


Nov 10, 2000: INBF 2000 INBF Northeastern WI Championship - Placing: 1


Sep 10, 2000: INBF 2000 INBF Midwest Championship - Placing: 1


Nov 10, 1999: INBF 1999 INBF Midwest Championships - Placing: 3


In what areas do you feel that you are strongest, in terms of experience to add to the conversation?

Competitive Bodybuilding and show prep.

In what areas do you generally not speak on?
Power Lifting

How did you come to your particular methodology, or is it still being defined?
Research-Trial and error-Asking Pro's Q's?-you never know everything so it's a on going learning thing.

What do you see as the biggest problem with barbell sports today?
The sales push for "get big over night with no work".

What are some of the biggest mistakes you're made along the way?
Beleiving the first thing I read with out researching it. (Mag's like FLEX)

When it comes to advice, how do you pick and choose who you listen too?
There prooven back round and track record. Proof is in the pudding type thing. Can there body back up there mouth.
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Last edited by Rich Knapp; 12-17-2010 at 07:00 PM.
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:59 PM   #8
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What is your lifting resume?

Played sports all year around throughout highschool (three sport athlete). I started lifting for sports at 16 at the school gym. Went from being a pudgy highschool kid to a solid one. I was more interested in getting stronger than looking good. When I got into college I stopped playing sports due to just being over them, but always enjoyed the training aspect. I lifted throughout college but still lived the college life with parties and late nights, but even with that I was still getting bigger and stronger.

After college, I became an assistant strength and conditioning coach (2 yr. position) at a small division 3 school in California. I coached over 20 sports in their strength and conditioning programs. As well as assisted in seminars for weightlifting, and training. I've trained with different training styles such as powerlifters, bodybuilders, and athletic performance.

When I was done with my position I became a Personal Trainer and a Track & Field Coach focusing mainly on sprinters and jumpers. I held and still hold the certifications of NSCA-CSCS (Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist) and USAW-Sports Performance Coach.

Presently, I am training for my first bodybuilding competition. DO WORK!

In what areas do you feel that you are strongest, in terms of experience to add to the conversation?

athletic performance, olympic lifting, powerlifting, and using the gym to build character, sports nutrition

In what areas do you generally not speak on?

bodybuilding nutrition, contest prep..i generally stay pretty quiet about things.

How did you come to your particular methodology, or is it still being defined?

My methodolgy is an ongoing journey. I'm still a student of the iron game.

What do you see as the biggest problem with barbell sports today?

Misinformation by others who aren't experienced

What are some of the biggest mistakes you're made along the way?

not being consistent, and trying to be like other people. When it all comes down to it, you only have yourself to rely on.

When it comes to advice, how do you pick and choose who you listen too?

if i know that the advice is coming from a reliable source. I also listen to whoever has something to say because I believe you can always learning something for everyone.
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Old 12-18-2010, 08:49 AM   #9
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Old 12-18-2010, 10:34 AM   #10
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What is your lifting resume?
Always being the skinny kid growing up, i tried lifting weights with the concrete and plastic sets. And use of the schools weight room. I didnt really ever have anyone show me how to properly do any lifts, and the fact I seen very little progress, i gave up quickly. Not having a father around growing up made it tough too, so I enlisted in the army national guard as a jr. in high school. The summer I spent in basic training was the first time I seen any real progession in weight gains. I packed on 12 pounds and lost a pant size doing the Uncle Sam program. I was impressed but was discharged on a medical hardship within a year. It would be nearly 12 years before I took lifting serious again, once I became a career firefighter, I knew I had to start seriously looking at getting stronger. I tried a few programs and saw very little results with them and again feeling frustrated almost gave up on strength training feeling I was doomed to always be the skinny kid. Then a few guys decided to put together a Firefighter Combat Challenge team, and I came across the stronglifts 5x5 programs and I was hooked. Been seriously lifting regularly for 2 years now. Taking some breaks here and there.

In what areas do you feel that you are strongest, in terms of experience to add to the conversation? I'd have to say I still don't feel that great about passing along information, I can only share what has worked for me. My primary focus has been athletic performance. Strength and Conditioning. I've been curious about powerlifting not confident offering help.

In what areas do you generally not speak on? Bodybuilding, Diet and nutrition but i'm getting better on that one.

How did you come to your particular methodology, or is it still being defined?
I would say, it's definately still a work in progress, but have found that the simpler things are, the more apt I am to follow them and understand them.

What do you see as the biggest problem with barbell sports today? With so many "experts" out there it's hard to know who to trust. I also personally believe the way some supplements are marketed, tends to give folks a false sense that they can take the latest greatest supplement and make gains without hard work.

What are some of the biggest mistakes you're made along the way?
See above, I thought I could take some of the stuff out there I bought at the store and it would make me bigger. Not staying consistent, and not eating properly( still working on this one guys)

When it comes to advice, how do you pick and choose who you listen too?
I tend to listen to "real" people. Folks who have had similar struggles like me, and are now successful. I also look for guys who keep things simple and tell it like it is. Don't give me a bunch of words and terms that make no sense to me. Lay it down in a way a raw beginner or an advanced lifter will both understand. I also lean towards the folks who do more athletic strength and conditioning as opposed to bodybuilders, just because thats where my goals are at.
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