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HITman_mark71 01-21-2010 11:08 AM

Religion question
 
My wife and I had this discussion last night. Most of us and our friends were raised in a religion but no longer practice that religion. This seems commonplace for couples without children or couples under 30.

Were you raised in a religion?
Did you practive that religion in your 20's?
Did you go back to a religion after you had kids?

I don't want to start a holy war, but I am curious if anyone else shares the same experiences.

jhuse2 01-21-2010 02:56 PM

I was raised as southern baptist. My mom is methodist. I kinda practiced both. In my early 20' I started to believe more like a Messianic. Now I just do the right thing, Teach my daughters proper morals and hope that what I have done is enough.

BendtheBar 01-21-2010 03:03 PM

My mother had us baptized Lutheran. We went to Sunday school until about the age of 7. After that, no church.

My wife and I explored churches after out kids were born. We were pretty "Christian ignorant." We wanted to teach our children right and wrong.

We spent a year church shopping. We ending up learning a lot from the teachings of Jesus, and changed many of our views and actions. But we're not Christian by any means (if you would ask a Christian).

I've studied a lot of Eastern philosophy in my 20's. I really didn't find much direction from it, but learning about it was soothing and mellowing.

I spent a good 2 years of my life researching and studying world religions. This became a passion of mine when we began exploring churches. I learned a lot during this time, but I would prefer to keep my mouth shut :)

RickB 01-21-2010 04:02 PM

I was raised Catholic. I am married to a Southern Baptist, so when I go to church, that's where I go. But we don't go very much.

I do believe, but I'm not a bible thumper, and I actually despise those that are stone throwers. I like jhuse mentioned try to teach my kids morals, ethics, and respect for others.

I do not believe there is one religion that is 100% correct. Much like lifting, you must find what suits YOU!

tim 01-21-2010 07:55 PM

I was baptised catholic but then my mother wanted to switch me to lutheran so we started that. I married a catholic and its still a on going debate what to have our daughter baptised as but were leaning towards lutheran.

lefthookright 01-23-2010 01:23 PM

Just raised non-denominational Christian not 20 or have kids yet :p but I can't really see myself going anywhere else

kitarpyar 01-23-2010 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HITman_mark71 (Post 20935)
My wife and I had this discussion last night. Most of us and our friends were raised in a religion but no longer practice that religion. This seems commonplace for couples without children or couples under 30.

Were you raised in a religion?
Did you practive that religion in your 20's?
Did you go back to a religion after you had kids?

I don't want to start a holy war, but I am curious if anyone else shares the same experiences.

Well, once upon a time, I actually used to pray regularly. My parents wer not and are not deeply religious although they isnt exactly atheists.

So,
a) I wasnt exactly deeply raised in religion
b) Still in 20s, but no, I have not been practicing religion in my 20s. Forget the last time I ever went to a temple to pray.
c) Lol, yet to have kids, but I strongly suspect I wont go back to religion once I have kids.

Truth is, at some point in my early teens, I realized that the idea of god may have some merit (which is why, despite not being religious I am no atheist). However, around the same time I also realized no matter how religious you are and how regularly you practice your religion, what really cuts it is what you end up doing. Praying is good for moral strength, but really, all the praying doesnt help unless we work hard and do what we think is right according to our conscience.

And really, to act according to your conscience, one need not be well-versed in religion at all. That's what I like the best.

jdmalm123 01-23-2010 02:03 PM

Were you raised in a religion?

Yes. That's where I met God, but He and I don't hang out there anymore.

Did you practive that religion in your 20's?

Yes. I even went to a Christian college. After my church, whose leaders promised to subsidized the college, broke their word and withdrew support from the school to buy themselves million dollar paintings and jet fuel, I was slightly disenfranchised.

Did you go back to a religion after you had kids?

I do not have kids and don't plan to. I think if I did have kids, I would find some form of formal religious training for them.

Curiously, the Greek word the apostle Paul used to describe the Old Testament law was "pedagogue," which means "baby sitter." My understanding is he was implying the formal rules of religion are for the spiritually immature and those that understand fully do not need to be told/reminded regularly how to live in love.

Now, I find numerous analogies between strength training and spiritual training...

big valsalva 01-23-2010 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jhuse2 (Post 20986)
I was raised as southern baptist. My mom is methodist. I kinda practiced both. In my early 20' I started to believe more like a Messianic. Now I just do the right thing, Teach my daughters proper morals and hope that what I have done is enough.

Yep. You, me, and the late Reggie White. What Would Jesus Do? Something Jewish, no doubt.

I was brought up in a non-denominational/charismatic church. About the time I started exercising some independance, my parents started going to a small Baptist church. In my mid-20's, I experienced a return to my early upbringing, and became quite involved in a charismatic church. I married a Methodist girl, but somehow convinced her to attend my charismatic church. Then, as is typical in those kinds of congregations, some congregational upheaval caused us to leave. We church shopped for a few years, but never gave up on those charismatic teachings.

To cut to the chase, I had a pastor challenge me in those teachings. I decided to make a concerted point of Bible study to build a case for "getting rich quick," living by the Spirit, and speaking in tongues. Not only was I struck down by the Word of God, but my eyes were opened to exactly how anti-biblical (and anti-Christ) the teachings of the modern "Christian" church are. I learned that the Bible is a continuous story with no distinction between the Old and New Testaments, although I had been taught that the Old way failed, and the New way was better. No! The Old set the stage (was an example) of the New. Jesus was not the first "Christian," but rather He was the consummate Jew. He taught us to live according to Moses with the compassion that the Father had intended.

Now, since there is no Messianic congregation in my town (the closest is 80 miles away), we do our best to 1) Observe God's Holy days (weekly sabbath, Passover, Yom Kippur, etc), 2) Observe God's food laws (no pork, shelfish, etc.) 3) Live morally separate from the world, while 4) Living compassionately connected to the world.

My rant ends.

BendtheBar 01-23-2010 02:34 PM

One thing that I noticed as I studied Jesus and his relationship with the Pharisees was the peculiar similarity that the modern Christian Church and it's different denominations (38,000) and doctrines had to the Tower of Babel. Just as they all spoke in different languages, so do most all modern denominations.

Understand, this is in no way a condemnation of the Christian faith. Just something I found rather interesting. Perhaps it is God's handiwork that the denominations do not unite.

In any case, I am fascinated by Jesus. Though I have read and studied the Bible, Jesus is most stunning to me because of his opposition to the Pharisees and religion.

I sometimes wonder if Jesus appeared to the modern Christian community if he wouldn't be crucified once again. Here is Wisconsin, we have so many Lutheran denominations that dislike one another. That sounds like a strong word - dislike - but I believe it to be accurate. They held a Lutheran prayer summit and it broke up before the prayer because of different denominational beliefs.

Again, not a condemnation of Christianity or Christians. Just the reality that many Christians are very pharisaical. (So are atheists for that matter - it's a human condition, not a Christian condition)


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