View Single Post
Old 11-12-2010, 09:09 AM   #5
glwanabe
Senior Member
Max Brawn
Points: 15,106, Level: 79 Points: 15,106, Level: 79 Points: 15,106, Level: 79
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
 

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5,268
Reputation: 150539
glwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master member
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoopDawg View Post

I am in the process of trying to build a bodybuilder's body.

Build your body, not everybody else's. Strength and health, with proportion will get you where you need to be. What final size are you trying to reach, and how do you know you can get there from here?

Bodybuilders body is a very open ended statement. What era of Bodybuilder?
If I asked you to show me a picture of what body your trying to achieve who would you show me?




Not wanting to get complicated just want know what you guys use for these bodyparts.

GOOD! Complicated is not needed!! Complicated strokes a lot of peoples ego, but does little to build muscle. It is not just as easy as asking what do you do? You have to build your body as a total unit. Everything interacts and affects the other parts. This is why a simple program is better than a complicated program. Especially for people who have not yet reached natural limits.

I love it when people say they can't work tri's on chest day, becasue they have hit there tri's so hard during bench. DUH! Your Tri's are about 50-70% worked, just finish them off, and be done with it.





Now i Didnt put arms or abs because they get worked very easily.

Arms need to be worked directly, but not nearly as much as people put energy into them. Abs need to worked hard, as well as lower back.



The shoulders/chest/back are a bodybuilders make-up.

This is an incomplete statement. Chest training takes up far too much space in most peoples workouts. They would do themselves a favor and put shoulder and back training well above building Arnolds chest. Arnolds chest was too big for his body. Most BB's have a chest too big for their frame.

You are also leaving out the hips and quads. You need power through your hips and quads to lift big weight. These guys with tiny waist who look like females with an hourglass figure do not impress me.


A pair of huge shoulders can make 17 inch arms look like 22's

NO!!! 17inch arms are big!! 22 inch arms are roided out freaks.

Look at my AV pic. How big do you think my arms are in that pic? Putting 1 inch of solid muscle on your arms is a BIG increase in muscle size.


There are lots of good programs out there too build a body with. You can just throw crap at the wall and see what sticks, and then use that as a program, and you will have some limited success.

You will have far better success if you lay out your entire program so that everything is covered methodically, and then work the program. It takes weeks to see changes, and years to make a serious dent. It does happen though with hard work.

Don't overthink, and do not make this more complicated than it needs to be. Let everybody else make that mistake. Just keep hitting it when it is time.

Some of the best programs you will find are labled as Golden age training methods. There is a lot of info on this subject here on MAB. Do yourself a favor and educate yourself on how these, OLD GUYS, built bodies that most people will never have, nor could they hang with the training.

Here is some basic info on what you might be able to achieve for a well proportioned body.

In his “classic physique” book, Reeves said his formula for “ideal proportions” was as follows:

Muscle to bone ratios:
Arm size= 252% of wrist size
Calf size= 192% of ankle size
Neck Size= 79% of head size
Chest Size= 148% of pelvis size
Waist size= 86% of pelvis size
Thigh size= 175% of knee size

Steve Reeves’ height and weight chart for a bodybuilder (natural)
5’5” 160lbs
5’6” 165lbs
5’7” 170lbs
5’8” 175lbs
5’9” 180lbs
5’10” 185lbs
5’11” 190lbs
6’0” 200lbs
6’1” 210lbs
6’2” 220lbs
6’3” 230lbs
6’4” 240lbs
6’5” 250lbs

Last edited by glwanabe; 11-12-2010 at 09:59 AM.
glwanabe is offline   Reply With Quote