Thread: CNS Burnout
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Old 10-28-2009, 02:28 PM   #15
BendtheBar
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I would like to suggest an experiment. One that has you both overtraining and taxing your CNS, with minimal TUT.

Here goes: Take 80% of your deadlift 1RM. Now, perform 40 reps, rest pause. Take 10-30 seconds to recover from each rep before the next.

If you CAN get past 20 reps, you're a stud. If you get to 40 reps you're into overtraining and taxing the CNS.

This is a moderate volume of weight, and the total TUT for all reps is only about 3 minutes.

This experiment shines a light on the reality that taxing the CNS can come from nearly any training style, and that it is not solely dependent on weight, intensity or TUT.

I believe we can curbs ALL training variables so that we don't tax the CNS, not overtrain, and still gain strength and muscle. If you shorten rest between sets, you need to curbs sets. If you add volume of sets, you need to curb weight and/or add rest.

Just thinking out loud, and not proclaiming that this is the gospel. Trying to encourage thought on this issue.
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