Thread: CNS Burnout
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Old 10-28-2009, 11:45 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwys61 View Post
Here is my perspective. Remember, I'm no doctor.

CNS Burnout: When the body plateaus or regresses due to extreme heavy loading without the proper rest or nutrition I agree.

Overtraining: When the ligaments, tendons, joints, bones and/or skeletal muscle become damaged due to overworking. This doesn't require extreme loading. Hence marathons and such I would also add true muscular failure...which is hard to achieve.

Rebuttle?
comments?

This is a great thread
See the bold above.

In general, I believe that what we perceive as "overtraining" is actually CNS burnout.

I also think it's laughable how some of you think that CNS and muscularity are mutually exclusive. They are absolutely dependant on eachother. I will go as far to say that your CNS controls your gains.

My guess is that the iBodybuilder program over at T-nation is built around conditioning your CNS in order to produce optimal muscle performance. Once you have stimulated your CNS and muscles enough and hormones begin to flow, you stop for the day to let yourself (CNS) recover. In essence, they are trying to time the peaks of the CNS, musculoskeletal, and hormonal outputs. Creating "the perfect storm" for muscle growth.


One of the original questions, what do I think degrades CNS performance?
Time under tension - That could mean slow reps, negatives, reps completed once in a fatigued state, etc.
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