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Old 04-24-2010, 10:07 AM   #10
glwanabe
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1) Not cycling

This is covered with number 2.

2) Overreliance on low reps

Not really a mistake if your continuing to make gains. However,
cycling to higher reps, can be used for a variety of reasons, and can help
spur new progress if stalled. If it's not broke, why fix it?


3) Insufficient emphasis on other lifts


Only if you have identified weakspots that isolations would help cure.
Which lifts ar they specifically targeting. Include to many other lifts, and your training like a bodybuilder. Let me chase my tail with #5


4) Failure to correct weak spots

Probably the most true statement taken at face value. However you have to be able to identify those spots and have the right plan to correct them.

5) Training like a bodybuilder

The most untrue statement given, taken at face value.





Look, don't make this harder than it has to be.

1. Pick a program and work it.

2. Keep adding weight to the bar whenever possible. (progression is king)
When you stall, reset and make another run at it. Does this a few times, and if you don't gain ground, evaluate your program, and make changes as needed. isolate the weak links, and strengthen them.

3. Don't abandom your whole program, just make minor course corrections.

4. Have fun.
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