View Single Post
Old 09-12-2009, 05:54 PM   #26
glwanabe
Senior Member
Max Brawn
Points: 15,106, Level: 79 Points: 15,106, Level: 79 Points: 15,106, Level: 79
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
 

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5,267
Reputation: 148251
glwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master memberglwanabe is a master member
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuscleandBrawn View Post
I think this is a solid approach. Too many young lifters are lateral-a-holics on the delts, and don't focus on strengthening them.

When I really started to focus on delts, my bench rocketed up.
There is a lateral move we were doing that involved a static hold in the up position. You would raise the dumbells up, and hold for a five count. Not only did this work you medial head, but your bicep got worked hard as well.

We also did a static hold using the olympic bar in a front raise. You really had to contract your whole upperbody to be able to hold that 40lb bar out in front of you. We did this move to build strength for a full planche hold. You have to have the front delt strength for a planche.

My joints were a real weak link when first trying these moves. Things got better as I got stronger, and I was feeling much better after a few months of steady work. I'd go so far as to say that for pure strength, these gymnastic moves worked faster than traditional barbell work. Due to the overall compound recruitment of muscles needed to do the work. An added benefit, is that it is just a fun workout.

This photo shows the strength needed by an elite rings athlete.

Last edited by glwanabe; 09-12-2009 at 05:58 PM.
glwanabe is offline   Reply With Quote