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Old 04-17-2010, 12:09 PM   #4
BendtheBar
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lerho View Post

So, I would like to hear how other people do it. Is this a good way (Im just at the beginning)? And how people who are at "my goal levels" have done it... Just nice discussion and opinions. Is it better to switch earlier to bb-type of training, split bodyparts etc, or do it this way? Also is it better to keep bodyfat levels reasonably low or really trying to maximize strength gains and then diet down later?

Discuss and advice me..
The best way to train as a beginner is with a simple fullbody starter routine. This is the most effective routine for most (not all) naturals. Splits tend to encourage the use of too many exercises, and move the focus off simplicity and on to the desire for a magical formula. You can use splits, but I wouldn't venture beyond a simple A/B split for a while.

With that said, if you find you are making great gains, a 3 to 4 day split can be used as you become an intermediate lifter.

Regarding fat gains...this is a heated topic. Beginners gain rapidly during their first 12 months so they should be eating at least 300 to 500 calories per day above maintenance. This will add on some fat, of course, but undereating is dangerous territory.

It's best to start with eating more. Monitor your body, and make calorie adjustments from there. Each body responds differently, so there is no magical calorie level.

To get as big and strong as fast as possible you need to eat aggressively, but reasonably. If you gain weight too quickly, pull back on the calories by 300 a week and see how things are going.

After a year or two of good gains, muscle gains slow and there is no need to "eat big". During these periods you should eat a cleaner diet slightly above maintenance levels.
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