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Old 11-08-2013, 01:03 PM   #5
mohiz
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Finland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl1174 View Post
it is by far the easiest way to progress...

Just a question, how long do people think linear progression will work for? Is it really a viable progression scheme for advanced athletes? Just playing devils advocate here, but surly it will only work for so long? Or is the idea of linear progression still viable right up to our potential?
I as well am interested in hearing answers to this question from some of the more experienced guys in here.

So far I don't see why it wouldn't work indefinitely, because even if it slows down and you can only get 5 lbs past your previous stall after each reset, it's still progress.

Using the squat as an example, say you stall at 400 lbs, then reset to 360 and take 8 workouts or about 3 weeks to build back up, and then stall again at 405... This is the point where many would hop programs. But if you look at it another way, you've still made 5 lbs progress in 3 weeks which is not bad if you think long term. Maybe at that point some other progression method would be faster, though... I don't know.
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Last edited by mohiz; 11-08-2013 at 01:06 PM.
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