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Old 09-21-2013, 09:01 AM   #4
Kleurplaay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic1976 View Post
This is a fair answer.
I'm just thinking about something. Lets say I have done a squat workout, 30 minutes or something like that. Lets assume my MPS is elevated for 12 hours.
But if I eat no protein at all during this 12 hours, will my body catch up later on?
So will this MPS in the Quads, hams, glutes and shoulder gridle stay elevated until there are enough amino acids to recover those muscle groups.
I'm not sure science has done research on this.
I think I know what you mean, but the thing you need to know is that amino acids are in your body 24/7, think about the wallet, as long as you supply your body with sufficient protein every day, it'll always have enough laying around for things like MPS. So in practice with a decent diet you will never miss out on elevated muscle protein synthesis because there are always amino acids available. But theoretically yes if you had 0 amino acids in your body you would 'miss out on' those hours of elevated muscle protein synthesis. This never happens in the real world unless you're doing something crazy like fasting for a full week or something.
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