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Old 07-30-2013, 02:51 PM   #12
IainK
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I agree with your conclusion. Unfortunatly your 'study' dosn't prove this;

Your time frame is too short. Given the meal you had, even if fasted, you could still be digesting/absorbing for a couple more hrs.

During the time frame I would not expect much change in rate glucongenisis to occur. Certanly nothing that a capillary sample would detect with much accuracy.

The meal was off mixed compostion.

I certanly would not expect to see a change in urinary protein content.

n=1



Its a valiant effort but even using varied biochem methods and calculations in labs its not a simple thing to get right.

Again, I believe your thesis to be correct! There is no arbitary number that needs to be set against the amount of protein that we can absorb from a feed. It's more a matter of 'time' than much else. There off course is a debate about the increase in protein balance that can occur from a single feeding or protein. Protein balance can indeed be at basline inspite of significant concentrations of cirulatory amino acids.
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