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Old 07-07-2013, 01:54 PM   #2
Tannhauser
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That's a very interesting post.

I sometimes wonder how that relentless positivity can be maintained in the face of inevitable reality. Take a 100m sprint, for example. If every competitor is in the mindset of 'not admitting the possibility of failure', and so on, then seven out of eight runners will turn out to be mistaken. And then what? Do they enter the next race with the same feeling of invincibility? And if so, do they have to forget their previous failure?

I think there comes a point where saying, 'I can succeed at this no matter what...' becomes simply delusional.

Our culture bombards us with stories of the indomitableness - if that's a word - of the human spirit. 'The doctors said I would never walk again...and I didn't!!' simply doesn't cut it dramatically, nor is it newsworthy. And yet statistically, it's more representative of reality.

I guess I could be called cynical inasmuch as I think the belief thata positive attitude can accomplish anything is largely a romantic and comforting fable.
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Lifetime PRs

Powerlifts: 500/363/573 @ 220 belt only
front squat: 403
dips: bodyweight + 176 x 4
military press: 232
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