Thread: Ditch the whey?
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:43 AM   #18
dossas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LindenGarcia18 View Post
Right,well.

I'm going to stick with the same progression scheme of 2.5 kg every time I do the lift, because that seems to have worked well for the past month or 2 I've been training. I lost track somewhat of where I was in terms of weight on the bar, so I'm going to go through every lift tomorrow, and reestablish where I'm at on each exercise.

What might, and very likely will prove difficult though, is finding the happy medium between a weight thats too light or too heavy.
For example with barbell rows, I could pick a weight that allows me to hit 5 reps, but I'm not going to be able to go right up to my chest, and probably will only be able to go half the way up.

I don't know if thats right, or weather I should revert back to using a lighter weight, where I can get that full range of motion.
Though If I do that I'll feel as though I'm taking a step backward.

You said yourself that if I'm not getting stronger, progressing, and building muscle, then all that food I'm eating is going to have the opposite effect, and make me fat rather than muscle bound, and surely if I'm going back a step and start building my way back up to the weight I was using before, which may take over a month, I'm wasting my opportunities to grow, because I won't be getting stronger.

I don't know weather worse form with heavier weight will get me better results, or weather going backwards somewhat on some of my lifts, so I have perfect form, even if the weights lighter.
To add my two bits to your original question - think about how guys got big and strong before supplements were this readily available. Supplements can help you when you have built your foundation...Don't stress if you can't afford it. Cottage cheese is another great lean source of protein as well. Also, GNC is pretty expensive - are their not any online companies where you are??

Secondly, you should never really sacrifice form for more weight. As they say, "CHECK YOUR EGO AT THE DOOR". Every person here would rather you start with an empty bar and add weight slowly, BUT keeping your form proper. You even said that's what was working for you before, so don't stop.

More reps is also a form of progression, so spend some time under the bar and you will eventually learn what you can do at different rep ranges. For me their really isn't a direct answer to "what do you bench" or "what do you squat"...my question is how many reps should I do first?

And finally, remember that "this is not a sprint - it is a marathon". Keep your own log at home (as I and I'm sure as many of the guys here do). Review it, add/make notes and learn from it.
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