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Old 02-21-2013, 08:56 AM   #10
jslep
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Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Minnesota
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Quote:
he said my hip flexor was weak, which allowed my femur to rotate out, which messed up the alignment of the knee.
OK there is some contradiction here so i thought i might try to address without coming across as an arogant know it all. So your therapist told you the above which would be true to a point. The hip flexors as a group assist in rotation only.

Quote:
but you're knees cave in big time....
Now the knees caving in or pronation distortion is caused by stronger ad-ductor muscles than ab-ductor. Which means the muscles that hold or move the knee in are stronger than the muscles that hold or move it out.

You see the problem here is you say your problem is the femur rotating out and causing patella tracking to be off but when you do your squats the femur is acctually rotating in.

Now if you are able to force the knees out and maintain form during a squat thats awesome and keep rockin em with the appropriate weight. But if your pronation distortion cannot be cured you should not be doin squats until it can be. Although with the appropriate weight squats should be able to be performed by anyone.
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