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Old 02-11-2013, 11:12 PM   #14
jdmalm123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cutty View Post
Not thread jacking but JB, what if you don't have the mobility/flexibility for par/a2g squats unless you go wider?
Stuart McGill, PhD

Assessing the Acetabulum for Optimum Squat Performance (Pelvic Rock)

This one comes from Dr. McGill's book, "Ultimate Back Fitness and Performance" which is excellent and I would recommend it to any clinician or coach.

"The depth of the anterior labrum of the hip joint acetabulum is a major determinant of the ability to squat deeply. In order to find the optimal hip width (or amount of standing hip external rotation), have the athlete adopt a 4-point kneeling stance. From neutral, rock or drop the buttocks back to the heels. Mark the angle at which spine flexion first occurs. Then repeat with varying amounts of space between the knees. Look for the optimal knee width that allows the buttocks to get closest to the ankles without any spine motion. This is the hip angle that will produce the deepest, and ultimately the highest performance squat. It is much wider than most people think."
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