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Old 01-23-2013, 08:06 AM   #16
Paradox
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,125
Training Exp: July 2011 (competition)
Training Type: Sheiko
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I'd love to chime in a bit about Sheiko, as it's really the only one of these programs I have experience in.

Previous to starting Sheiko I had tried a westside approach and 5/3/1. I wasn't getting gains out of either one. Since switching to Sheiko in May 2012 I've gained 30-40kg on my squat, 10-25kg on my bench, anddd not much on my dead (5-10kg). All of these are more gain then I'd had in a couple years on westside and 5/3/1.

I'll admit that this could potentially be from switching from low frequency to high frequency, but I also want to disagree slightly with the notion that technique work at 70-80% won't carry over. If you're constantly drilling mental cues into your head, you're definitely going to be more likely to just do them without thinking when it comes time for a competition. Additionally, all of those sets at a relatively low percentage allows you to work on technique a lot. You can really catch issues and work on them.

Another thing, Sheiko programs DO go above 80%. There are several days that are 85-90%, although they are often limited to certain programs (Sheiko 30, for example, has at least two squat days with 90% work).

Finally, I'd like to add one little notion. BORIS SHEIKO is a COACH. Those numbered programs you see in excel spreadsheets and on websites are for a specific athlete at a specific time of his or her training cycles. The philosophies of Sheiko are what is important. Following Prilipen's chart, use block periodization, etc. In this way, you can have accumulation blocks with not much 90% work, but you can then use an intensification block with plenty of 90% work (IF that's what works for you, programming your own "Sheiko" is all about knowing what will work for you, personally), followed by realization to peak. Yes, Sheiko is purely a competition based approach to strength. You practice the lifts like a pitcher practices throwing, or like Dwight Howard SHOULD practice free throws; repetitively.

EDIT: I'd also like to add what is somewhat trendy right now: Work capacity. "Sheiko" builds a tremendous amount of work capacity, and lets you program it fairly linearly. Upping your overall work capacity is, as many think now, the only true way of getting "stronger" overall.

Last edited by Paradox; 01-23-2013 at 09:46 AM.
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