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Old 01-16-2013, 07:31 AM   #6
Paradox
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Join Date: Jan 2013
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I think it really does depend on whether we're talking about raw or gear here. An argument can be made for single-ply vs multi-ply as well.

I have absolutely zero experience with multi-ply. In fact, I haven't even seen multi-ply gear in real life. That being said, until very recently I was trying go to wide and squat like a multi-ply guy. I've discussed this in another thread already.

To me, there are very few circumstances where wide stance squatting beats conventional squatting when raw. It requires a tremendous amount of mobility to even reach depth (I've found this personally, as have others) when squatting wide. Taking a shoulder width stance (approximately) let me hit depth a LOT easier. This was even when working mobility religiously.

Additionally, I think the extra load that a lifter can place on their quads with conventional vs wide stance squatting also helps tremendously when raw.

The only caveat I can really add to this is that extremely long legged raw lifters can often get away with wide stance squatting and have it be better for them than conventional (eg Dan Green).

Like I said, I can't speak about multi-ply, and only have a little experience with single-ply. I would tend to agree that lifters should build their conventional before moving into wide stance squatting for multi-ply.
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