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Old 12-03-2012, 10:01 AM   #3
bruteforce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abett07 View Post
I understand that people who are new to weight lifting are a long way of their genetic potential which results in faster strength gains , but are these fast strength gains caused more by neurological adaptation or muscle growth ?
My totally non-researched answer is:

Both.

Neurological adaptations certainly account for a lot of the massive increase in strength. Sort of like any other sport. You go from sucking pretty hard to being just mediocre in a month or two or practice. Then it takes years of practice and work to get really good.

For size gains, most noobs are woefully undertrained. Thats what makes them noobs. Its pretty easy the body to get to a strongish, healthyish state in most cases. Not the inhuman standards that we all want, but a basic level of functionality. After that you have to fight harder to make it go past what it sees as "good enough".
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