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Old 11-29-2012, 08:30 AM   #8
BendtheBar
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Join Date: Jul 2009
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Hello Bill,

What type of training is good to strengthen tendons and ligaments?

It seems like I build muscle strength faster, which always lead to tendon pain.

Thanks,
Nick R.
Brooklyn, New York

====================================

Excellent question, Nick!

Tendons and ligaments form the joints of the body.

While most trainees concentrate on developing the muscles of the body, it is well to remember that injury to the joints will bring any gains in strength to a screeching halt.

Furthermore, it will take a long time for the joint to heal so that you can continue your training.

In addition, it becomes even more important as you age.

Therefore, it is vitally important to treat your joints with respect.

Proper warm up is key.

Wear warm clothing when training.

Perform slow light, full extension, full contraction, movements mimicking the heavier, more strenuous, exercise that you plan to perform.

How do you know when you have warmed up properly?

Perspiration and accelerated breathing.

When you have reached this point, continue with the heavier exercise.

Perform the exercise SLOWLY, and DO NOT go beyond the threshold of pain.

Pain or discomfort is your friend, it is a signal to stop the activity.

However, the proverbial, "No Pain, No Gain", idiom is downright dangerous!

Fast and furious, slamming and banging of heavy weights is an accident waiting to happen...

Especially, when you experience fatigue.

Again, proceed slowly.

If you experience pain in your tendons and/or ligaments, apply cold, not heat, for ten or fifteen minutes to the area to relieve any swelling.

Rest the joint by adding an extra day for recuperation to allow the joint to heal.

If it persists, contact your physician, you may have tendonitis or bursitis.

One of the best books ever written that addresses tendons and ligaments as well as physical conditioning is right here, check it out:

John Jesse - Wrestling Physical Conditioning Encyclopedia

Until the next time...

Yours for greater strength,

Bill Hinbern
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