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Old 11-19-2012, 09:35 PM   #2
BendtheBar
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Louisiana
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Pushing for a rep you don't have the strength to complete is certainly more taxing on many of the body's systems. We tend to look only at the muscular system, but you also have to account for the CNS, connective tissue, etc. There is a greater chance of form breaking down as well, depending on the lift and the discipline of the lifter.

So yes, all things equal you're pushing everything harder. That doesn't necessarily mean better. The upside/downside ratio of training to failure on that lift has to be weighed.

If you believe in the school that says you have to annihilate the body each session then you're probably training to failure. I am not from that school, not do I believe in training annihilation. But that wasn't your question, so excuse my interjection. There are many from that school and they are pretty big, so it certainly works as a tool.
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Last edited by BendtheBar; 11-19-2012 at 09:41 PM.
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