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Old 08-17-2012, 10:26 AM   #27
MikeC
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I think we have to be careful here tossing around terms like justifying bodyweight. Heavier powerlifters are stronger. In my time on this forum I have learned a lot about powerlifting from the members. From what I can tell heavier powerlifters aren't just undisciplined slobs who recklessly add weight and then justifying it by saying I'm a powerlifter. Weight appears to be beneficial for strength, at least for the natural athlete if I understand Fazc and BTB correctly.

Weight plays a role in both sports. In bodybuilding athletes seek a temporary unhealthy bodyweight level to show off their hard work. In powerlifting some powerlifters choose to seek an unhealthy bodyweight to become as strong as humanly possible.

I attended a local natural USAPL powerlifting meet this last year with my sons. I don't think there was an athlete over 260 pounds. I am guessing here but most were 230 pounds or under.

Judging the weight of average powerlifters by looking at top athletes is like going to an IFBB pro show and then expecting natural bodybuilding contests to look about the same.

Last edited by MikeC; 08-17-2012 at 10:26 AM. Reason: Bolded text by mistake!
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