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Old 08-03-2012, 10:46 PM   #5
IronManlet
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While I understand the underlying points of the article, and agree with a few of them, this:

"The mechanics of overhead pressing stresses the anterior and inferior glenohumeral capsule. Adding load creates an increase in stress to these structures creating laxity and functional instability which can lead to impingement and improper utilization of the rotator cuff musculature required for dynamic stabilization through an overhead movement." Maybe Lochte is unique in his ability to tolerate overhead pressing without aggravating his shoulders but in this way he would be the exception, not the rule and this (overhead pressing) is not a model to be followed by other swimmers, overhead throwing athletes or people such as fighters or football lineman whose shoulders undergo great stress.

Is pure horseshit.
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