Thread: Dump the Pump?
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Old 02-06-2010, 04:15 PM   #1
onetiredkris
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Default Dump the Pump?

This is a excerpt from the NFPT study manual. Putting this up to raise some eyebrows and get some thoughts, as I know most people judge the success of their workout based on the pump they received.

Quote:
“The Pump” Swelling of the Working Muscle.

Generally speaking, the majority of molecular elements are either carried
or diffused across microscopic capillary and cellular membranes if the concentration
of that molecular element is lower on the other side of the membrane.
However, relative to exercise, if the pressure of fluid on the outside
of the muscle cell membrane is greater than on the inside of the membrane,
the molecular element lactic acid, and wastes accumulating inside the muscle
cell during long sustained contractions, cannot be excreted. The build up of
excessive amounts of the intracellular fuel, lactic acid, is partially responsible
for contractile failure in high rep sets. This lactic acid disallows maximal
adaptive stress, and therefore compromises size and strength increase.
The following is an explanation of the occurrence of the pump. Lactic acid
builds up during anaerobic energy production in proportion to the intensity
and duration of cellular work performed. Since the cell membrane
is impermeable during contractions unused amounts of lactic acid cannot
escape. The longer the contraction is maintained, the greater this lactic acid
build-up. During this light, high rep training, the contracting muscle tissue
not only experiences a build up of lactic acid it also expands in circumference
causing a constriction of blood flow (a “kink” in the vessels if
you will) in the microscopic capillaries in the interstitial spaces. After a
long set, when the muscle relaxes, the back pressure of blood flow is relieved
(removing the kink.) This rush of blood into the working muscles makes
them appear much larger which subsides upon completion of the workout.
This tremendous amount of blood, immediately re-entering the microscopic
capillaries, is then perfused into the interstitial spaces where it exerts
pressure against the cell membranes. This pressure then prolongs the presence
of unspent intercellular lactic acid which will cause premature failure
of contraction in sets to follow if not given ample time for removal. This
occurrence is known as the pump, and should therefore be avoided if size and
strength increase is the client’s goal. This deserves repeating. The “pump”
should be avoided if size and strength increase is the client’s goal. Training
for this “pump” does of course have tremendous general health benefits
such as providing for a more efficient nutrient and oxygen delivery as well as
an improved waste and carbon-dioxide removal.
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Last edited by onetiredkris; 02-06-2010 at 04:19 PM.
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