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Old 05-30-2012, 11:30 AM   #59
glwanabe
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making a roux.

1:1 ratio of fat, and flour.

For the fat you can use lard, butter, or a vegatable oil. I like to use butter for some dishes and vegatable oil for others. Seafood dishes or etoufee's will utilize a butter roux. Roux that will be taken to a very dark color will use lard or another oil.

Roux is cooked at a medium heat, and you must not rush the process. Cook it to fast and you end up with a burnt roux, and you need to begin again.

You add nothing else at the initial stage, just fat and flour, thats it!

NO SEASONINGS TO START! ESPECIALLY SALT! You do not want the oil to breakdown. Adding stuff at this point will breakdown the doil in a bad way, especially salt.


put your oil in the pan and begin to bring it to temp. When it is hot, add the flour into the oil, and begin stirring. You must keep stirring the roux or it will burn.

I prefer to cook roux in as heavy a pot as I have, and with a wooden spoon. Some people will use a whisk. I used a black iron stockpot, and my best wooden spoon.

Be ready to spend up to an hour cooking a good roux. 45 mins is about the average, if your using the right temp, and depending on how dark you are going to take it.

The roux I made yesterday was taken to a dark chocolate color, and took nearly 50 mins to cook.

Questions fo far?
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