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Old 05-29-2012, 01:36 AM   #16
Chillen
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For me this is a difficult question to answer.

For years, I have read about people whom are seemingly healthy, athletic, in shape it seems, see a doctor regularly, take stress tests, try to eat right, take no illegal substances, or abuse alcohol, (etc), live long and prosper or die an early death--or still live to average age. Some are sudden without warning, and for others is a disease of a major organ (for no known reason, or personally caused), or by other means.

Meanwhile, I have read about people whom are aren't healthy, non-athletic, out of shape and overweight, do not eat right, regularly consume illegal substances, or abuse alcohol, (etc), live long and prosper, or die a early death or still live to average age. Some are sudden without warning, some live longer than compared to their seemingly healthier humans, and for others is a disease of a major organ (for no known reason, or personally induced).

Now, consider the average age of death for men and woman (where things are considered equal).

It becomes a pretty interesting subject matter.

Obviously, what we do...or do not do, on the things we have control over...effects our health dependent on what we are discussing.

Today, at the hotel, for example, I was talking to a world war 2 vet, whom is 92 years old. Very intelligent, has his mind, and gets around great. He is a smoker of cigarettes and cigars (as witnessed from the lobby).

Is he considered healthy? And, since he smoked since the age of 16 (as we talked later), would he have been considered healthy then?

Is this an exception rather than the rule? Why is "he" an exception as compared to someone else, whom may do the same exact things but die much earlier? Genes? Heredity?

Why is it that someone who "tries" to be reasonable healthy while living, die at "average age" and the 92 year old, in which may be "doing things" some would logically decide not healthy, live nearly 20 years longer in comparison?

Some dust seems to settle on: The things in which we have control over (eating habits, exercise, smoking, etc), our environment, genes and heredity, how we are put together and efficient in functioning, and the things in which we do, and how tolerant (as a whole) our bodies are.

Obviously, we are not all put together the same way, though we are made of the same things.

The path we take isn't "always" up to us. Though we can try to alter it, improve it, delay it, etc, what trumps all, is the little biological beasts inside us all.

Its called the efficiencies/deficiencies inside us (and family history) , and how this is processed within our bodies. And each of us are different. There is no guarantee that you live long and prosper eating right and staying fit.

Odds increase you live longer? Maybe, maybe not.

But I like the "odds" on the diet and exercise side of the equation, despite the potential biological factors that play a role within me.

But death is a guarantee. This is going to happen.

However, its rare you see "a morbidly obese" person at the average age of death (say for men) around 76 years old.
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Last edited by Chillen; 05-29-2012 at 01:48 AM.
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