View Single Post
Old 02-22-2012, 10:22 AM   #1
big_swede
Senior Member
Max Brawn
Points: 34,215, Level: 100 Points: 34,215, Level: 100 Points: 34,215, Level: 100
Activity: 62% Activity: 62% Activity: 62%
 
big_swede's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: sweden
Posts: 12,014
Training Exp: 5
Training Type: Strongman
Fav Exercise: Cable flyes
Fav Supp: Celltech
Reputation: 480503
big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!big_swede is one with Crom!
Default Uncommon Benefits of Leg Presses

Quote:
Uncommon Benefits of Leg Presses
The level of difficulty of performing a good, strong squat is almost tenfold to that of a leg press. The heavier the weight becomes, the more precise the lift mechanics become, meaning that everything from foot position to weight balance to scapular positioning plays a huge role.

This level of difficulty isn't the case with the leg press, meaning it's easier for beginners to learn and can work with a full spectrum of individuals, from rehab to advanced. It's also a lot easier to perform dropsets, pyramids, rest-pause sets, and eccentric-emphasis sets compared to squats.

When training rehab-based clients, the leg press is fantastic for grooving the triple extension pattern using a fraction of their own body weight. I can have a client fresh off a total knee replacement performing a single-leg press with 10% of his body weight in a controlled manner, which will help to retrain the hip and knee musculature to fire together and limit the stresses on the new joint. I can also take a more advanced client and load up a single-leg press to a point where they can only perform one or two reps with full range of motion.

Another benefit is developing bottom range strength in the hips, such as when the hip is flexed to terminal range of motion. The hip range of motion during a squat is typically from zero degrees of flexion to only around 90-120 degrees, depending on the mobility of the lifter, whereas the range of motion during the leg press is typically between 90 degrees at the top of the movement to 120-150 degrees at the bottom, again depending on the mobility of the lifter.

This means that a completely different range of motion is being trained for the hip joint, so that if you rotate between squats and the leg press, the hip is being trained through a more complete range of motion than one or the other.

Full article at T-Nation - T NATION | Is the Leg Press Worthless?
__________________
big_swede is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links