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Old 12-29-2011, 01:35 PM   #7
jasonjduke
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I liked it Rich. I don't care much for dogmatism, but Alan seems to have a grip on the fact that if it (program) is working keep doing it and if it ain't - stop and change it up.

This is a very nice statement that he says:
"Hypertrophy is something that can be achieved with pretty much any intensity of load, as long as the work is progressive. However, the far ends of the spectrum (super low reps and super high reps) make this process far less efficient."

I could take it further from my own experience and agree - progressive planning truly is key to hypertrophy. I realized this when I did a "beginner" with light weights of 12-15 reps for 3 months and then dropped the reps to 8 per set and jumped the weight - blam, I experienced textbook hypertrophy. He says that super low and super high reps make the process of hypertrophy less efficient. I would say that if one could "boomerang" out of super low or high reps with progressive programming than one may actually coax the hypertrophy process for even better gains.

As for his comments on bulking and cutting - perfect. Only the advanced trainee should even consider doing phases of these sorts. I like how he came up with the "culking" term for those newbie folks who constantly bother with all the excess bull of such things (really everything) instead of just putting an honest to goodness effort forth through the principles of proper programming protocols of progressive resistance. What I mean to say is that if you can train and eat properly, bulking and cutting actually become unnecessary.

Last edited by jasonjduke; 12-29-2011 at 01:46 PM.
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